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glove_boxEven if your runs primarily depart from home or office, running or racing will likely take you to points best accessed by car at some point or another.   Not everyone can have everything in the car at all times, but a few key items left in the car (rather than trying to remember them each time out) can make a driving runner’s life a bit easier. Furthermore, even when days, weeks, or months go by without needing to use these exact resources, knowing they are there can reduce concern and stress heading into an important effort.

 

Blanket / towel (or more than one)

One of these items can provide protection and warmth after a surprise cold rainstorm on a November morning, or a layer between you and the driver’s seat when the air is thick with humidity.  Having a towel or blanket can also make it more likely you will take a moment to stretch or roll, or spend 5-10 minutes adding some core work to the end of your run when you have a spare few moments.  If you or someone you are with is really in distress, a blanket or towel can be invaluable sopping up a variety of bodily fluids, and takes up relatively little space in the trunk.  Although the absorption value isn’t there, a saved space blanket from the end of a long race can also be an easy to store, useful item as a layer between a gross, sweaty, or wet you and your car / the elements.

 

Fuel

Fueling directly after a hard workout or long run is key to regulating your blood sugar and quickening recovery.  Take a moment to stack a few of your favorite bars and some gels for mid run replenishment in the glove box or in a Ziploc in the trunk.  This will ensure you can top off the tank at the end of your run and avoid a midday bonk or rash meal decision due to the sharp pang of hunger + fatigue.  Sometimes, you are coming from a location where you can’t select or prepare a snack to bring with you for before, during, or after.  If you have a snack readily accessible, your chances of success in that workout or run will increase.

 

Water

Even one spare 16 ounce bottle can be of great help if you exhaust your fluids on the run and arrive back at a trailhead with no facilities and a lengthy drive to the nearest gas station or store.  Water can also wash dirt or blood away as needed due to mid-run mishaps.  Pack a dissolve-able tablet or two of your favorite electrolyte replacement fluid with your fuel stash, and you will be in even better shape.

 

First Aid Kit

A must.  Even if it includes only some bandaids, Neosporin, and some basic gauze, tape, and perhaps an anti inflammatory, the chance to tend to a mishap directly after it occurs makes a huge difference compared to how that same injury might react hours later.

 

A charger or an adapter

When in remote areas, having a phone charger that works with the car can be of significant help in a tough spot, and with the proliferation of chargers with USB ports, charging a GPS device with the car’s power is now easily possible as well.

 

Hat with a bill, gloves

A running hat with a bill is compact and crushable, but can help keep water from the eyes in a rainstorm and sun from the face when no clouds are in the sky.  Gloves ($1 gloves from Target, or similar), can feel like the most precious piece of clothing when they are really needed.  Neither takes up very much space.

 

A Roller or a Stick

Again, if your run is squeezed between other appointments or engagements, or involves a decent length drive to and from, consider keeping a stick in the car.   It takes up very little space, and can be used both to loosen up before the run as well as to start the recovery process without some of the stiffness inevitable on the drive back.

 

Wet Wipes

No longer just for the backsides of babies, these come in handy packets and can save the day in an unlimited array of hygiene and cleaning scenarios.

 

Every runner has their particular comfort items, their specific variations of this list that provide peace of mind and care when things haven’t gone well, or even if they have.  A bit of forethought to keep some of these items on hand when driving to runs can clutter the trunk, but can also help our bodies handle the rigors of training well, even while in the midst of our complicated lives.



logoIn July, many athletes begin training in earnest for a fall goal race. We’re glad that this year, more runners than ever are doing so with runcoach.

 

A runner announces their new training cycle with a fresh pair of shoes brought home from the running store, or an acknowledgement they are about to embark on their first official long training run.  Then, he or she often gets the fun questions to answer – Wow!  When / how did you decide to run a marathon?  Why did you choose that race?  What time do you want to run?  In contrast, runcoach wants you to be able to answer the questions no one will ask – Wow! What is your predicted half marathon time?  Do you have access to a treadmill?  Can you run on Thursdays?

 

In short, one of the significant ways runcoach is different than almost any other training solution is the amount of focus we place on you and your current profile, rather than your hypothetical goals and hypothetical self.  Don’t get us wrong – we are completely invested in providing a path to progress your running as far as you can go.  However, instead of taking a random target and working back from it, we take your actual current profile / performances (or if there are no current or relevant races, we instruct you how to produce a hard effort to approximate a race).  From this, we forge an appropriate, sustainable path forward. Achieve mastery at your present level, then recover, adapt, and perform at peak productivity.

 

What if your goal was to break 4:00 hours for the marathon, but in 20 weeks, it turns out you might be actually better prepared to run 3:45?  What if you had in mind a 1:35 half marathon time, but forgot to factor in the crazy hills and stiff headwinds notorious on that course.  Goal setting is an important motivational cornerstone, but we know at runcoach that each person begins at a different spot – in their experience level, in their current fitness, in their weekly schedules, and in their natural strengths and weaknesses.  Our system provides our athletes with a program that is unique to each person, because each person is indeed unique.

 

As with any new coach/ athlete relationship, initially an athlete might be skeptical if the assigned workouts differ from what is expected.  Often we hear from runners who are used to a “go until you can’t go any more” approach to workouts, or a pattern of going hard everyday out on the roads. Other athletes have never followed a structured plan before and maybe sell themselves short on what they can do over various distances. Hundreds of thousands of workouts and successful goal races have reinforced for us that an approach including proper stress based on your current fitness profile, followed by sensible recovery, will lead to racing at peak performance.

 

Today, an aggressive approach and an ASAP mentality are present in many of the products we buy.  It is easy to be antsy over a five-minute wait when you are used to getting your Starbucks latté made in two. Remember when traveling across the continent or the ocean meant a risky wagon or boat ride and the very real possibility that waving goodbye to home was forever? Now, we are grumpy when a five hour plane ride is delayed one hour. Patience is in short supply.   At runcoach, we want you have fun answering the enjoyable questions from friends and family, but we also want you to be knowledgeable and confident enough about your present fitness to answer the tough questions as well.  We’re ok being the ones with the answers to the unpopular questions, and we’re excited that as our athletes achieve these goals, these unpopular questions are becoming much less so.



beach_runningAt runcoach, we love the enthusiasm of runners fired up after a successful first marathon or long goal race.  Many athletes find the cycle of goal setting, progressive workouts, and solid race performance to be an enticing combination, one which quickly beckons them again.  As a runner becomes more confident in the ability to complete the training cycle, execute the race, and recover, he or she may begin to look further down the road and plan two or three goal races ahead.  But, how many marathons are too many?

 

Each athlete comes equipped with an experience level, injury history (or lack thereof), and other daily commitments specific to them.   Each race also has its challenges and advantages – course difficulty, transportation set-up, weather, etc.  A tough combination of these factors might produce a decision to take things one goal race at a time, but if things are aligning well, we suggest taking about three-four months between marathons.  At most we recommend 4 marathons per year.

 

Many avid marathoners have found a rhythm with an annual fall or spring marathon, or maybe two marathons per year with plenty of time to recycle and train between each.  Other runners prefer to include goal races of different lengths interspersed between marathon attempts.  That could mean a target half marathon in the spring and a big marathon goal for the fall, or a season of running shorter races such as 5Ks and 10Ks to work on speed, while leaving a longer distance race for later in a particular year.  There is no “one size fits all” answer for these race choices, except our desire to make sure you leave enough time to train properly and arrive at race day ready to do your best.

 

It is not uncommon for runners to go through a period of time where enthusiasm is high and things are coming together so nicely a successful string of narrowly scheduled races can come off well.  However, it is also not uncommon for runners to change that pattern by necessity only after something has not gone well or nagging soreness has turned into an injury.  Your runcoach schedule is designed to progress you toward your short-term goals but also keep you healthy so that you can keep striving toward other long-term goals.  It is far better to have six excellent experiences over the course of two years with more to look forward to, than three experiences followed by a long string of injury and uncertainty.

 

Yes, there are those that can manage a spectacular workload and race frequency, but there are also those who must take the greatest of care to arrive intact at one goal race per year.  Most of us are between the two, and are hoping to continue our running and racing for years and decades to come.  Stay patient, and keep a sane race schedule.  We’ll help you train well, and together we can plan for many congratulations and “high-fives” ahead.



App_logoIn the fairytale Hansel and Gretel, the children overhear that they will be led out into the woods, destination unknown.  To find their way back to familiar surroundings, Hansel gathers a pocket of white pebbles and drops them along the path, providing a trail to trace their planned return route.

 

Hansel and Gretel are just like modern day recreational runners.  They know that tomorrow may bring a new journey away from home. The white pebbles ensure that they are mindful of the process along the way, and that they can retrace their steps (or avoid that path if preferred).

 

At runcoach, we don’t have a pocket full of white pebbles to give you.  We don’t even have a virtual pile of rocks.  However, we do have a tool that not only helps you recount and remember your previous steps, but also helps tailor the running ahead. That tool is our training log.

 

One of the most popular features of runcoach is the ability of our system to adapt and train you to your specific needs, even if those change on the way to your goal race.  If you turn an ankle and need a three day break, or if the flu has you down for a week, our plan won’t schedule you a 15 mile long run on your first day back.    If you decide to schedule a tune-up race six weeks prior to your goal race, the plan will adjust your schedule accordingly.  Likewise, if the workout as written was accomplished with unanticipated ease or difficulty.

 

Almost all coaches, whether in person or online, advocate keeping a training log.   It will help the athlete and the coach understand how to repeat, improve upon, or choose a different path based on how the previous training cycle played out.  A survey of elite distance runners would likely find an almost universal use of a training log tool of some kind.  Many have daily records of their running going back years and years. For decades, this might have been a notebook, or more recently a spreadsheet online.  With the runcoach training log, recreational runners enjoy the benefits of recording this information in the traditional manner, combined with our unique system to provide real time adjustments to your benefit. Even if you are not near your computer screen, our iPhone app allows runcoach users to update their logs on the go.

 

While the runcoach training log is a robust tool with many capabilities, it is most effectively used if the athlete is consistent with feedback.  Both ratings and differing outcomes from what is scheduled are crucial pieces of data to help our system carve a training schedule that tailors to your present situation and plans for future competition.  The more information you provide to us about how your training has gone, the better runcoach can serve you and your goals.

 

Typically, not everyone feels like recording the details of a difficult day or a workout that didn’t go as planned, but most are excited to celebrate a day that went as or better than scheduled.  Many athletes tell us of their dread for a day marked “red” vs “green.”  As coaches, we know that the days that don’t go well are at least, if not more important to know about as the days that go great.  Just as though we were standing there with you holding a stopwatch, letting us know your feedback, (good or bad), can help our system make more accurate plans toward your eventual success.

 

We view our relationship with our users as a partnership – we’re invested in seeing you through and beyond your goals, just as you trust us to help you get there.  The training log is a powerful tool to strengthen that relationship and increase the chances both of us will succeed together.  We hope that you will continue to use it and in doing so help us follow the path of white pebbles together.



 images
Like many of my red-blooded American middle-aged sisters, once I saw my first episode of Downton Abbey, I immediately proceeded to completely DVR binge the rest of the collection.  Although admittedly late to the party, this process proceeded according to the typical fashion. Quoteth the husband, “Ah Downton Abbey….I was hoping to go to sleep right away….. perfect….(snore)”

 

I was training for Boston and it was now mid-January - time to get down to brass tacks.  With a lot of solo long running ahead and in need of good reading while currently subsisting on a daily diet of early season Downton, my interest was piqued when a random iTunes search led me to find that Matthew Crawley reads audio books, and reads them like a boss.

 

If you have read this far, you likely know that Dan Stevens, the actor who so ably inhabited the character of Matthew Crawley for the first three series, is no longer doing so (see: #Christmas #Downton #carcrash #twitterpocalypse). Instead, he has been up to all sorts of things like producing and acting in a recently released movie, starring in a Broadway play, judging the 2012 Man Booker Prize, and writing. But what he should be doing, my friends, is reading audio books, because lawd ahmighty, he is very good at it.

 

With every new marathon training cycle, we learn new subtleties about the reasons we train. Originally exploratory efforts become tempered with expectations and a more complete understanding of the difficulties and physical pain ahead. Even if you love it all, a 20-mile route can begin to feel like rote if you have done it many times.

 

When running solo and on a safe route, my personal solution to these issues has been to press play. When I clicked “buy” on iTunes and started Fall of Giants, read by Stevens, I was at the trailhead of the tough part of the Boston training cycle with hundreds of miles ahead. First in a trilogy by Ken Follett of Pillars of the Earth fame, it fell squarely into my favorite dusty, middlebrow Michener/Rutherford bookshelf.

 

After many hours and miles listening to Stevens rattle off 20+ different accents from people of all ages and both genders, delivered with the weight, tone, and pace as if notes from Yo-Yo Ma’s cello, I was right back looking for the second volume, or a secret 1000 page appendix. As a kid, the characters of a well-read book almost leap from the page and visibly animate in the room.  Well, now I was five years old again, and had gotten used to these characters running alongside me while I shuffled along for hours on the San Francisco Bay Trail. Back to iTunes I went, only to find that another (probably perfectly nice) person had read the second book.  I quit the series and went pure Stevens-read until April.

 

Much has been made of the timbre of Stevens’s voice, but attached to the persona of Matthew Crawley, it has been confined by saying things like “You are my stick” for three years (and this is coming from someone who really enjoys the show). While his recent successes and the William Morris Endeavor agency will likely take him far commercially, I hope for the sake of my future marathon training (and for yours, should this prompt an iTunes run) that Stevens continues the likely financially inefficient pursuit of reading books to us. Perhaps he is just enough of a word nerd to do so.

 

As Stevens’s voice essentially became the narrator for my own journey toward the race, intertwined with the escalating weekly mile totals and the big fat long run at the end of the week, my kids would get in the car and hear some book I had plugged in after running and roll their eyes. “Does Dan Stevens read anything for kids?”  I was asked.

 

“Well, as a matter of fact, he does!” I happily replied, only to be reminded quickly how little my opinion counts.  Rather, my third grader asked to listen to one of the books popular with her set, the Dork Diaries (think Diary of a Wimpy Kid with a female protagonist). Quickly, I realized, I couldn’t take it.  Pages of “O.M. Geeeeeeeeee. Ma-ken-zieeeeeeeee! I was soooooooooo embarrassed I could hardly breeeeeeeathe!”  had me soon talking to the CD, occasionally banging my head against the steering wheel, threatening all sorts of things if they ever turned in papers that sound like this book, and ruing the day it was published.

 

Brilliantly, my older daughter recognized my distress at the inanity one day and blurted out, “Hey Mom, how would Dan Stevens read it?”  Now, our family has a durable new parlor game as well.

 

For each of us, this year’s Boston Marathon immediately ceased to be what it was the instant before we knew of the events at 2:50pm on April 15. Yet, the well-worn metaphor of training as a journey remains true here, maybe more so. In reflection, this season became a completely separate episode from the race itself, populated memorably by the various character tableaux as well as the creative and technical talent that kept my mind busy while my body did the hard work. I am reminded how precious is the gift of losing oneself in fiction, in music, in the observation of nature, or in a great conversation. May we all have a case of jet lag, a load of unfolded laundry or a run where our feet know the route well enough that imagination, for that mile or two or twenty, is again enough breeze to carry us to the other shore. And may Dan Stevens read a couple more books this year – I’m planning on another spring marathon.



Each week on the runcoach Blog, we draw your attention to a different issue related to running.  If you’ve never had a chance to really mine all the topics on the blog or if it has been a while, now might be a good time to revisit a few of the more basic topics we haven’t covered in a while.

 

Although you may prefer flat and fast courses, eventually you’ll need to scale a hill or two.  Read up on our tips for getting both up and down here.

 

While the relative luxury of long daylight hours and seasonal temperatures have caused you to temporarily forget about winter running in the dark , cold, and storms, as well as the hot weather ahead this summer, it is never a bad time to review a few ideas for how to manage those more tricky weather conditions ahead.

 

Regardless of the weather or the terrain, while you are out on the roads, you’ll want to move more efficiently.  Sometimes things we take for granted can make an impact if we invest a little energy in improving their effectiveness.  Arm swing, breathing patterns, well fitting shoes that suit your feet – all of these can make a huge difference.

 

Even the most efficient runner must learn how to manage the occasional ache and pain, and wise habits to prevent as many of these as possible can help a great deal.  In the blog, we have compiled some good advice from practitioners who have had a great deal of experience with common ailments such as achilles tendonitis , plantar fasciitis, sciatica, high hamstring tendinopathy, shin splints, and IT Band Syndrome.

 

When you finally get to the race itself, consider some of the factors that can have a big impact on your experience between the starting gun and the finishing tape.  We’ve covered topics ranging from planning your travel, managing race day stress preparing for mental toughness, getting sleep the night before when nerves take over, and recovering when the job is well done.

 

Whether this is your first time training for a goal race or you have been running for decades, the details can always make a difference. A few minutes spent refreshing the basics can mean avoiding a much larger problem down the road!



heel_strike40 years ago, the Boston and New York Marathons had only a couple thousand finishers between them, and the average running shoe was pretty spare (we’d say “minimal” today), without a great deal of cushioning and support.  Today, the average wall of a specialty running store yields a bewildering array of shoes.  Options include maximum cushioning, support, stability, and motion control.  Meanwhile, New York will likely have upwards of 45,000 finishers this year, and the increased popularity of Boston means that having a qualifier no longer means you will actually be able to secure a spot in the race.

 

These trends are related.

 

The increased technological complexity of running shoe design has provided a gateway to the sport of running for many individuals who are outside the physical  “ideal” for world class running.  In fact, the definition of “ideal” itself has arguably been shifted as many recreational runners who strive for personal bests and accomplishment take pride in the capabilities of their bodies to finish, regardless of how fast.  Along the way, the number of runners who may not be built for speed in the Olympic sense have been protected from injury by new technologies offering previously unheard of support and cushioning in a shoe.   That said, the shoes they wear may also have unintended consequences.

 

One of the major ways in which the average running shoe has changed from a generation ago is the amount of heel cushioning coupled with a higher incline off the ground for the back of the foot.  While many runners have a natural stride that lends itself to landing first on the heel, these shoes make it much more easy for anyone to land first on the heel.  Here’s why:

  • -The psychological feeling of protection  - try running barefoot on your heels…just doesn’t feel nearly as good!
  • -The amount of material extending off the bottom of your foot hits the ground first, mainly because it is in the way.

 

Hitting the ground first with your heel can have a couple of problematic results.

  • -If your foot lands on your heel first, it is likely in front of your body when it hits. This means that it will take an extended amount of time for your body to travel over the foot and for it to push off again.
  • -With your leg extended in front of you, it is possible your knee and hip can take some jarring forces
  • -You are spending needless energy each stride, transferring your weight horizontally from behind the foot.

Essentially, landing heel first isn’t the most efficient way to get from Point A to Point B.

 

Preferably for most of us, the first surface to touch ground on each stride should be the midfoot to forefoot, or right around where your shoe is the widest.  This is for a couple reasons:  one, it is really hard to land that far forward on your foot when your foot is extended out in front of you.  In fact, unless you are a ballet dancer, it is hard to even walk like this. So, in order for you to land on this part of your foot, it will be closer to your body, or ideally, pretty much right underneath your body.  This means that you will spend less time horizontally transferring your weight over your foot before push off, and can use the large muscles of your body to both land with everything aligned, and push off immediately, lessening the chance for the type injuries caused by your hip and knees absorbing chain reaction forces when heel striking.  Two, if you are taking steps that allow for your foot to land under or close to underneath your body, you are likely taking more frequent steps, what we might call a quicker cadence.  Although it might be tempting to think of long extended strides as the way to pick up speed, all that time in the air is just spent slowing down.  So, a quicker cadence means you are likely making more rapid progress in the direction you want to go.

 

“Minimalist” shoes, which have come into vogue over the last few years, have a much lower heel profile.  This discourages heelstriking  Particularly for anyone who makes the big jump from a highly cushioned shoe into a minimal model without a gradual transition, the extra work required for your calves can be felt without much need for explanation upon waking the next morning.   For some runners, these shoes are a good supplemental tool or solution if their bodies are ready for that type of transition and their stride naturally might lend itself to a more midfoot to forefoot strike already.  For heel strikers, these shoes might be a supplemental tool to help encourage good posture and start to work on running form, but should be used with caution.  If the support of the current shoe has been a positive injury prevention tool, it should continue to part of a runner’s arsenal.

 

Sometimes, we think of ourselves as a completely different brand of runner than the African athletes we might see at the front of the pack in races.  However, when researchers studied the foot strike patterns of Kenyans, they found that those who grew up running to and from school without shoes were more often forefoot strikers than those who grew up wearing shoes.  So, even among a group that we as recreational runners tend to see as homogenous, significant differences have been found based on their history of footwear.

 

While more research has yet to be done on this, what can we conclude about those of us who currently heel strike?  Regardless of how our foot strikes the ground, we all want to move forward efficiently.  Practicing short stretches (30 seconds or 2 minutes at a time, etc) with a quicker cadence will help teach yourself how to increase speed when finishing in a race and allow you to experiment with what it feels like to land more toward the midfoot.  If you are a steadfast heel striker who has relied on padded shoes to stay healthy, quicker, more frequent strides vs longer, bounding strides is still the way to go.

 

In short, we are in an age where shoe technology has allowed more people than ever to run for recreation.  Some of that technology has also reinforced not entirely ideal habits our body may naturally have, even as it allows to stay healthy enough to run at all.  We may be content to enjoy the race from our spot in the pace or we may be anxious to move up the standings.  Either way, mindfulness about how our foot strikes the ground and how we can increase our efficiency can allow us to have more fun along the way.



Why We Run! 

  1. Oh the Places You’ll Go – This Dr. Seuss book always shoots up the bestseller list during graduation season.  We’ll give it an extra plug today!  Running helps you see the world!
  2. Time Away from Technology – Running provides one of your only chances to separate from your computer and/or cellphone.
  3. Inexpensive – Yeah, sneakers are pricey…but running is still the cheapest sport around!
  4. Anywhere, Anytime – You don’t need a fancy gym membership or any equipment.
  5. Bonding Opportunities - Running is a great way to make new friends and catch up with old friends.
  6. Total Body Workout – Most forms of exercises only work one part of the body.  Running works both your arms, and legs.
  7. Meditative – Running offers a chance to relax and escape from your worries
  8. Get a burst of energy – Feeling tired?  A run can reinvigorate you and cut down on fatigue.
  9. Beach Body – Yes, we encourage you to do core.  But running will strengthen your abdominals too!
  10. Road races - Studies suggest that people are more committed to their exercise routiines when they have a goal.
  11. Turn that frown upside down - Otherwise known as the "runners high"
  12. Bonding time with Fido - An activity you can do with the dog!
  13. Pasta! - What runner doesn't enjoy carbs?  We encourage yo to eat a healthy diet, but running and the caloric burn will allow you to be a little more flexible with your diet.


Take Care on the Trail this Summer!



This summer, the call of the wild might draw you out of the neighborhood into your local trail system, or vacation travel might bring you closer to nature and out of your comfort zone.  What are some things to look out for when venturing forth on the trail?

 



Poison Oak / Poison Ivy

PoisonPlants
As the old adage warns, “Leaves of three, let them be.”  For both poison oak (found mostly on the west coast with variants in the mountain region and the south eastern United States) as well as poison ivy (mostly found on the east coast), even a slight brush can cause a nasty irritation for the next several days.  Poison oak can feature a reddish tint, while poison ivy is mostly green. Both plants have a surface substance that causes a skin irritation ranging from a row of small bumps, to significant swelling.  While on the trail, take care to avoid plants that appear like these. If you do come into contact with poison ivy or poison oak the rash may take a couple of days to appear, getting worse through about five days after exposure.  Then it can take  as long as a couple of weeks to resolve in bad cases.  The sap of the plants doesn’t dissolve into water, so it can be tricky to treat.  The blisters on the rash won’t spread if opened by scratching, but if hands or clothes that have interacted with the resin at the initial site of infection brush other areas, the rash can jump there as well.  Also, burning poison oak can send the poisonous material into the air, where it can even find its way into an unsuspecting nose or throat.  Let your imagination run wild with that one – definitely avoid!

 

Snakes

sirtalis1
Springtime means snakes are coming out from hibernation.  They may be unfamiliar with their new terrain, and may be looking for sun while it is still not warm around the clock.    Be on the lookout for them in places and at times along the trail where it may be warmer and sunnier than average.  These include exposed flat rocks, sunny patches in an otherwise tree-covered path, and midday sun when morning and evening are still cool.  If you do see one, leave a wide berth move slowly whenever possible.   Snakes typically are not aggressive, but defensive, so avoid picking at them with sticks or letting others with you do the same, even if you think the snake is not poisonous.  You never know.

 

Ticks


12-11-09tick
Now found more widely than the traditional hotspots of the northeastern and Appalachian Trail areas of the United States, these insects can cause great havoc if left undetected.  Small and black insects (usually encountering humans in nymph form), ticks grab onto the skin and eventually deposit eggs under the surface, which can lead to all sorts of diseases, but most famously, Lyme disease.  In an area where ticks are known to have been a problem, take care to wear insect repellent, light colored clothing (so ticks can be easily seen against the skin), long sleeves and pants (when possible in the weather), and to do daily checks so no ticks remain on the skin for any extended period of time.  Symptoms include a bullseye shaped rash, fever, chills, and muscle aches

Lightning

460px-Lightning-with-streamers
Spring and summer months may bring warm weather storms to your favorite local trail or far flung destination.  Without external warnings, you may be left to make your own judgments as to how to safely manage the situation if you have been caught unprepared .  Keep an eye on the sky to get a visual glimpse of any approaching storm or lightning flashes.  If the thunder has begun to close in rapidly (count seconds after seeing lightning until thunder sounds – then divide by five to estimate how many miles away), stay away from lone tall objects such as a single tall tree or open air picnic structure.  If wearing / carrying a metal object, leave it aside for the time being and try to move to a low lying place (between two boulders or hills, among a bunch of lower trees, etc).  If near your car, make sure not to touch any metal while taking shelter inside.  Finally, wait 15-30 minutes past when the storm has crossed over to ensure you won’t still be in range of stray lightning.

 

Running on the trail can be one of summer’s best treats.  Stay alert and make good choices which hopefully will allow you to enjoy yourself all season long!

 





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