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runcoachLet’s break some bad habits and work to create new positive routines. We often start the New Year off with the best intentions, but sometimes our priorities shift and our resolutions fade away. If this sounds like you, our hope is to help make this year different. Here are 7 quick tricks to hold yourself accountable:

1. Find a workout buddy – Knowing there are people waiting for you will act as a reminder to show up, and it will make the run more enjoyable.

2. Hire a Runcoach – A coach will provide the structure necessary to accomplish your goals (Coaches like myself = Cally, Rosie, Alex & Tom are here to support you).

3. Put a race on the calendar – Selecting a race gives you something to look forward to and something to work towards!

4. Look at your fitness journey as a lifestyle change – Be flexible, there’s no reason this journey shouldn’t be fun!

5. Less can be more – For those days you’re struggling, don’t force your workouts and risk burnout. Instead stretch or foam roll. We all need some down time.

6. Journal your progress – Have a written record of all of the hard work you put in! The Runcoach ‘notes’ section attached to each workout is an excellent way to journal your journey.

7. Treat a run like a priority - like brushing your teeth or eating breakfast. Build your run into your calendar, just as you would a work meeting.


Vicente Ferre placed 2nd in his Age Group at the Bryce Canyon 60k, and completed the 100k distance in 12h 40m. jan_nl

What is his secret to success? Enjoy every day of training and believe in yourself. Always be positive in the face of any adversity.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? There are times when we are training alone, with no company to motivate you. I get through it by going out to run and knowing that even though I'm alone in this country, I have my mom up there who is always with me. So... it's time to train.

What is the most rewarding part of training? When you have that feeling of having done your homework. To feel free while running, where you know that, at least for me, it is my therapy and at the end to smile and give thanks for a good workout. Because every run is great. We are so lucky.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? I do not consider myself a person to give advice, the only thing I do share are my experiences and always under my opinion. And my opinion about these last months training with you guys, has been very positive.

Anything else you would like to share? Thank you from the bottom of my heart. Thank you to the whole team, for helping me, advising me, and making my training and time worthwhile. I will always be grateful to you.


Select Your Goal

Written by Rosie Edwards January 20, 2023

We know not every goal ends in a race, so don’t worry, we got your back. Our New Goals list has been updated to better suit your training endeavors as you progress from where you are to where you want to be.

While you can still sign up using a race as your goal, these four New Goals options help you find the perfect amount of training and intensity you want in your personalized fitness program.
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1-Get Started! A 12 week plan to get you moving and in a new lifestyle routine. This plan is designed to build you to 8-12 miles/wk with a 4-5 Mi. Long Run.

2-Get Faster! A 24 week plan to get you more active towards long term goals. This plan is designed to build you to 8-12 miles/wk with a 4-5 Mi. Long Run.

3-Get Fitter! A 12 week plan to get you from your current fitness to the next level. This plan is designed to build you to 18-22 miles/wk with a 7-8 Mi. Long Run.

4-Go Further! A 24 week plan to get you more miles and intensity. This plan is designed to build you to 18-22 miles/wk with a 7-8 Mi. Long Run.

Happy Running!

Sign up here!
Runcoach
My Run Plan
Movecoach



Updated by Cally Macumber on Dec 12, 2022

winter_runningThe Holiday season has arrived!  The days are getting shorter, temperatures are dropping, snow is falling and your schedule is filling up.  Are you starting to doubt that you’ll keep your fitness goals on track all winter long?  We’ve got you covered!  Here are some tips to maximize your training opportunities: 
  1. Apparel makes a huge difference! You don't have to spend a lot of money on expensive gear, but layering is key.  Plan to wear an outer layer that blocks the wind and an inner layer that wicks the moisture away from your skin.  If it's extemely cold, add a mid-layer. 
  2. Don't overdress.  You'll definitely warm up as you start moving so pretend you are going to workout in weather that is 10 to 15 degrees warmer than it actually is.
  3. Run or walk in daylight whenever possible so you will be able to watch your footing.  If you must workout in the dark, always wear a reflective vest and bright clothing.
  4. Give yourself extra time to warm up.  Your muscles will need it.  Start out slowly and gradually increase your pace.
  5. We sometimes forget to drink enough water when it's colder.  Be sure to drink both before and after your workouts to avoid dehydration.
Treadmills can be boring, but if you can't find a safe trail or road, don't be afraid to head indoors.  Just keep these 2 tips in mind:
  1. A treadmill ‘pulls’ the ground underneath your feet, and there isn't any wind resistance.  Both of these factors make treadmill workouts a little easier.  Setting the treadmill at a 1 or 2% incline will offset these differences.
  2. Be careful not to alter your form.  It can be tempting to start leaning forward at the hips or to grasp the handrail.  Look for a treadmill in front of a mirror so that you can make sure you maintain your normal form and posture.


Patricia recently ran her 6th NYC Marathon! She speaks to her journey to this point, both successes and obstacles. Success_Story

Major milestone: This will be my 12th marathon! I ran my first marathon in Los Angeles in 1996 and ran San Diego in 1998 (the 1st Rock n Roll marathon) and a few others until I ran a Rock n Roll marathon in 2004 in Arizona on limited training and “suffered” the last 13 miles! I didn’t run a marathon again until the 2017 NYC marathon which I got into via lottery and only then started training. This Sunday will be my 6th NYC marathon.

What is the secret to your success? I have always been a disciplined person and have enjoyed running for over 30 years! Every year, I have run at least a 1/2 marathon and in the early years I raced 5ks and 10ks almost every weekend!

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? I feel I do not recover as quickly now and have had little issues as my training progressed. Last year my back hurt quite a bit after about 13 miles…this year, I struggled w/right bunion pain and pain in my left foot after attempting 19 miles two weeks in a row! 

What is the most rewarding part of training? I love the feeling when I’ve completed my session successfully even if oftentimes slower than was designated in the plan!

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? I have reached out to my coach and she always responds quickly w/advice on how to proceed when I feel pain. For example, I have been aqua jogging the last few weeks at her suggestion and my left foot feels much better!

Anything else you would like to share? I love running the NYC marathon! The crowds are amazing and it’s just a positive, wonderful experience to finish!!!!!

What feedback would you offer on the Runcoach experience? Take it a day at a time and reach out to your coach for advice and positive motivation.


winter_runnerIt's dark. It's icy. Let's admit: It's just hard to get out the door when you instantly turn into a crystal the first few steps outside.

But you have goals to pursue, and miles to run. So, let's find the right gear and attitude, to face the worst of Mother Nature's surprises.

 

Protect The Head

Your head is your control center. if you head is cold, your body will be too.
Find a hat or headband to cover the majority of the head and ears.
Products with Merino wool are perfect as they breathe well, wick moisture, and resist odors.


Wrap The Core

Dress in layers and focus on the core. Think of it like a sandwich. 
1-Base layer to wick sweat away that clings to your skin. 
2-Then a long sleeve shirt or half zip that you can potentially even take off mid run if you get too hot. 
3-Finally a windproof shell (think jacket) to be the first barrier against the elements.



Perfect The Pants


In most situations your legs only need one layer (vs the core). Choose a fleece lined legging or pants for extra warmth. You don't want your pants to be too long or loose. The closer the cloth is to your legs, the better it will keep you warm. If you are running through snow, choose some tall crew socks and tuck the bottom of your pants to the sock!



Go For Glory With Gloves

Depending on the temperature you might find that your core and legs are warm, but hands are cold. This is because our extremities are the first to feel cold and lose circulation when the body tries to warm up.
If it's mildly cold pick a thin pair of sweat wicking gloves. These are relatively inexpensive and can be purchased at any apparel store.
If it's windy or below freezing, ditch the gloves for mittens. Mittens keep your finders together, better for circulating body heat. Some mittens come with a wind proof shell, perfect for running in wet winter conditions.

 



Night_running_croppedIn order to fully enjoy the benefits and experience of outdoor exercise, it is important to stay safe.  Although some basics seem fairly simple and even obvious as sound preventative measures, even experienced runners and walkers might do well to review a few simple safety tips.  Although mishaps are rare, the habit of good safety practices can really make a difference that one time when you are desperate for help.

 

Tell someone when and where you are going

If someone is expecting you at a certain time and you don’t arrive, they might send the help or make the call that might prove crucial in that very small chance that you really are in trouble. If no one is aware that you are past due or where you might have gone, those who care about you might have a much tougher time tracking you down.  Leaving a note on the counter, sending a text, or just telling a friend, family member, or co-worker what you are up to is a good habit to keep.  Even if you live alone, leaving a note to be seen by someone else in the event another needed to enter your house while looking for you, a text to someone else, or even an online calendar entry take next to no time at all, and can help others to track you down if things really have gone awry.

 

Be visible

Whether you are running or walking at dusk or dawn, in bad weather or hazy good weather, on a remote trail or a busy road, it does not hurt to wear bright clothes. Make choices that ensure other pedestrians, drivers, cyclists, and others can see you.  Be visible to traffic coming the opposite direction when you don’t have an ample shoulder, be visible if you are sharing a bike path with quickly moving wheeled vehicles, and be visible if you turn an ankle, fall into the bushes and need some help.  If you don’t like loud clothing, a bright hat or even a white hat / visor can often do the trick.  Time to jump on board with the neon trend, even if that means donning a reflective vest at night.  That split second of recognition can make a huge difference in a challenging traffic situation.

 

Have water

This piece is not the space where we talk in depth about the value of hydration as a training tool.  However, water can be crucial if stuck in hot weather or other challenging situations.  It is such a simple thing to bring a water bottle that we might take it for granted, but if you have ever been in a prolonged situation where clean water would have been useful, you will likely never forget again.

 

Be aware of your surroundings

Just like the defensive driving course you took as a high schooler, runners and walkers should always keep their surroundings in mind.  Scanning the path ahead will allow you to stay one step ahead of dangerous situations.  Keep your eyes open for individuals who might be following you in city locales, for quickly opening car doors, for cars entering and exiting driveways.  Be on the look out for wildlife that might pose a problem in less densely populated areas, aggressive dogs with no visible means of restraint or territorial boundaries, and topography with an ankle-challenging pothole ahead.  Furthermore, either ditch the headphones, wear them in one ear only, or turn the volume low enough that you can still be aware of the ambient noise.  That moment of awareness can make the difference.

 

When possible, go with a buddy

Many of us run or walk solo more often than not, but when possible, it is always safer to go along with a friend who can help if something goes awry, and make any individuals with less than wholesome intent think twice about encountering you.

 

Finally, leave a trail

Well, not literally like Hansel and Gretel, but GPS enabled devices, a phone that can indicate your location even if you are unable to – these things can make a big difference.  You might already be carrying your phone for music, but it may prove to be even more important in this capacity.  With running shorts now sporting several pockets, and companies coming up with new types of light pouches every day, there are many ways to carry these things without impacting performance or your enjoyment.

 



Even if you’re not competitive or you’ve never raced, a Turkey Trot is fun way to get the holiday season off to an exhilarating start. Most Thanksgiving day events are fun, non-competitive community events that benefit worthy causes. If you’re a more seasoned runner, you can use the Turkey Trot to test your fitness, or in lieu of a quality workout. Either way, you’ll be able to enjoy all the holiday treats much more knowing that you’ve already made an investment in your health.

  1. Make it a Family (and Friends) Affair. Whether you’re spending the day with family members or friends, a Turkey Trot is something loved ones of all ages, and levels of fitness and experience can savor. After the race, you’ll all have plenty of time for prepare the meal, catch the sports, and relax. The companionship from family and friends can ease any pressure you might feel about the event. And having a family outing helps reduce the stress and the focus on the holiday meal. Some exhilarating outdoor time can ease holiday stress and relieve any guilt you might be feeling about missing out on training.

  1. Dress Well. Wear shirts, shorts, and pants made of technical materials that wick sweat away from the skin. Avoid cotton, which can cause painful chafing. Dress in layers that you can shed as you warm up. If you’re racing in wintry conditions, it’s especially important to cover your fingers, ears, and head.

  2. Set Realistic Expectations. If you’ve been running on a regular basis, look at your training log and consider the paces of your recent workouts to figure out what a realistic finishing time be. If you haven’t been working out regularly, or you’re recovering from hectic travel, don’t sweat the outcome. Consider doing the race as a run/walk or running without your watch. Alternate between walking and bouts of running so that you can sustain an even level of effort from start to finish..  

  3. Fuel Well. There’s no need to carb load for a short race like a 5-K or 10-K. But have a carb-rich snack of foods that give you a boost without upsetting your stomach. Aim for foods that are low in fat and fiber. Bananas, oatmeal, and toast are all great choices. If you’re running in a 5-K, aim for 200 to 300 calories. Drink plenty of water, as dehydration can make even an easy pace feel difficult. Leave plenty of time before the race to hit the bathrooms.

  4. Start Slow, Finish Strong. When everyone around you is running as fast as they can, it can be tough to focus on running at a comfortable pace that feels sustainable for you. It’s easy to get caught up in the adrenalin of the race pack. But if it’s your first race, it’s important to focus on a strong finish that leaves you feeling positive, confident, and excited about racing again.  When the starting gun fires, think about taking the first 5 to 10 minutes of the race to warm up your muscles, shake out any stiffness and pre-race stress, and ease into your own personal feel-great pace. As the race continues, think about gaining strength with each step closer to the end, and finishing feeling strong.

  1. Adjust your schedule. Add your race to your Goals and Results feed, so we can make sure you have the proper spacing between this effort and your next challenging tasks, and “Adjust Schedule” if necessary. Use the unique flexibility of our training platform to stay on track!


Have questions? Contact Us!



Darrel has had an inspiring journey since heart surgery in 2021. He shares the importance of consistency and quality coaching guidance. Screenshot_2022-11-06_4.48.40_PM

Major milestone: Beginning after heart surgery in November 2021, my first milestone was 60 yards. I'm now up to eight miles. Actually, each time that I went farther was a milestone!

What is the secret to your success? Consistency. I know that mornings are best for me. Vigorous activity is essential to keeping my heart healthy.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Sometimes it’s the time requirement to finish beneficial workouts. Sometimes it’s impatience and the need to go at a pace that is neither too slow nor too fast. I remind myself that results depend on spending time on quality workouts to achieve worthwhile goals. What is the most rewarding part of training? Finishing the exercise. Feeling the burn or the fatigue when it’s time to relax.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community?
Talk with the coaches. Trust the program. As long as you’re working on fitness goals, give yourself grace on missed days or more difficult sessions.

Anything else you would like to share? Always before I trained for marathons or ultras (10 total) on my own. Training methods have changed these past 20 years. I needed sound guidance to rebuild from ground zero. My coach, Hiruni, encouraged me. She always replied to my messages. The Runcoach program is an effective training system. 

What feedback would you offer on the Runcoach experience? Runcoach offers so much to inform and encourage runners to meet their goals. The personal contact is real. The resources are extensive. You are doing well. Please don’t stop.


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