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stepsrunnerWhen you’re pushing your body farther and faster than it’s gone before, details matter. Neglect the seemingly small things—nutrition, recovery, and sleep—and you could set yourself up for a setback. As you prepare for the J.P. Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge, here are some tips to help you stay healthy, get fit, and ready to run your best when the starting gun fires.

Sleep. Sleep deprivation can impact performance and raise your risk of injury. Studies have shown that sleep provides a critical opportunity to recover and heal from tough workouts, and get stronger. It’s the time when the body repairs strained tissue and regenerates bone and muscle so you get stronger. Plus it helps stave off weight gain. Sleep deprivation signals the body to produce more ghrelin—the hunger hormone—and less leptin—which signals that we’re full.

Warm up, cool down, and stretch. Take time before your workouts to do a dynamic warmup routine—watch videos of the moves Movecoach recommends here—to increase running efficiency and range of motion, and decrease risk of injury. These moves will help make you stronger, and prepare your muscles, bones, and joints to push on the final stretch to the finish line.

Hydrate. Studies have shown that even mild dehydration has been shown to make even easy runs feel difficult, and and impair your ability to run at an even pace. Sip small amounts of water throughout each day so that you start each workout well hydrated. Be sure to rehydrate after tough workouts to help aid recovery. When it’s hot outside, or if you’re a particularly salty sweater, reach for low-calorie sports drinks to help replenish your carbs and electrolytes. How do you know if you’re well hydrated? Do the bathroom test. If your urine is pale yellow, then you’re well hydrated. If it’s darker – say the color of apple juice – drink more. If it’s clear, back off. Use thirst as your guide; experts have established that thirst will guide you to water when you need it.

Listen to your body.  Training for a race should help push you out of your comfort zone, but it shouldn’t feel like torture. Some muscle soreness and achiness is normal after pushing yourself farther or faster than you’ve gone before. Rest and cross-train with non-impact activities when you need to. It is far better to take one day off of training to give your body a chance to recover, than to run through pain and turn a minor irritation into a full-blown injury that sidelines you for weeks. If you have pain that persists or worsens as you run, see a medical professional for an evaluation.

We’re looking forward to taking the J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge SFO with you on September 7. You can see more training tips here. And be sure to look for us on race day.  Click here to get to know the Movecoach Team!



runningbuddiesWithout a doubt, one of the best parts of regular exercise is discovering that your body and your mind are stronger, fitter, and more capable than you ever imagined.

Naturally, we want to share those mental and physical benefits with our coworkers, friends, and loved ones.

But if you’ve ever tried it you know—helping someone else move more can be tricky, especially if they’re not already exercising on a regular basis.

Here are 4 tips on how to make help a coworker, friend or loved one start exercising on a regular basis.  

It’s easy to Invite a Coworker to join the Movecoach Challenge. Click here to learn how.

Start with small successes. If you’re well into your fitness journey, it can be easy to forget how frustrating, intimidating, and physically difficult it can be to start an exercise regime.  Try to remember how you felt on those first classes, walks, runs, and trips to the gym. From the gear to the special lingo to the feeling of pushing your muscles and joints in ways they haven’t moved in awhile, there are a lot of emotional and mental barriers to getting started. To increase the chances that your colleague will stick with it, set them up for success. Start with small goals—say a 10-minute walk, or by tracking movement with a step counter—and suggest that they increase their activity goals in baby-step increments. As the person accomplishes these goals, he or she will gain confidence and comfort with the exercise, and soon be eager to start pushing themselves farther and faster.

Start where they are. You didn’t get to where you are now overnight—no one else will either. While you may see that your colleague or friend has the potential to run for 30 minutes, finish a marathon or bike commute to work, understand when saying so that may feel intimidating to to that person. You also don’t want the other person to feel like if he or she starts exercising, that person has to run a marathon, or walk for an hour. Even small levels of effort and periods of exercise have big health benefits. Start with small goals. Once the other person has the experience of exceeding his or her own expectations, he or she will be eager to start raising the bar.

Keep ‘em company. One of the scariest parts of any new experience is going it alone, and not knowing what to do. Offer to keep your friend or colleague company on those first trips to the gym, lunch-break walks, or after-work runs. Let the other person set the pace. Take your workout with your own goals at another time.

Be careful about unsolicited coaching. So many pieces of game-changing advice can make or break your exercise routine—it can be tempting to pour all your good advice on the other person.  But you want to avoid overwhelming the other person with too much information all at once. You also don’t want the person to feel like he or she is “doing it wrong,” or being corrected. Obviously, you want to help the other person steer clear of injury risk—say, by running on the wrong side of the road, or attempting to exercise in old, worn-out, inappropriate shoes. But beyond that, let the other person’s questions lead the way. And when you do share advice, be sure to do it in the context of how you experienced similar struggles and got over them.

Any questions? Write to us at coach@movecoach.com.



Have active friends at your company or know coworkers who want to move more? Invite them to join the Movecoach Challenge.   Here's how:

On your mobile device:

1. Tap the Me icon (on the bottom-left corner of your phone screen).
2. Select "More."
3. Select "Invite Coworkers."
4. Send your coworkers an invitation to join Movecoach.

From the web, on a computer:

1. Login.
2. Click on the arrow next to your profile photo on the upper right-hand corner of the screen.
3. Select "Invite Coworkers" from the drop-down menu. 

Click here for tips on how to help a coworker start exercising regularly and stick with it. 

Any questions? Contact us.



Our system syncs with Google Fit, which tracks activities on Android devices. Here's how to sync Google Fit with your Movecoach account:

On your mobile device:


1. Tap the Me icon (on the bottom-left corner of your phone screen).
2. Select "More."
3. Select "Sync A Service."
4. Tap "Sync with Google Fit."

From the web, on a computer:

1. Login.
2. Select "Training" from the top of the screen.
3. Select "Sync a Service" from the upper left-hand corner of the screen.
4. Select "Google Fit" as the service option.

This action will take you to the Google Fit website.  Log in and follow the instructions.

*Remember: Your workouts are uploaded from the server of each syncing service, not the device that you wear. In order to upload your activity to your Movecoach or Runcoach training log, you must regularly sync your device to Google Fit's web platform.




2blue-shoeHere are 5 tips to get a smart start on your training for the J.P. Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge:

  1. Stick to your plan. You’ve set a goal, and Movecoach has designed your training plan. Stick to it. Many runners take their easy runs too fast, risking injury, and sapping the energy they need for quality workouts, like intervals. As a result, they often end up injured, or fall short of their goals. Remember: you can adjust your schedule any time you. Just hit “Adjust Schedule” from the Training screen on the App.

  2. Buddy Up. Fitness is funner with others. So make a training date with a coworker or a group. You’re much less likely to work through your planned lunch run when you know someone is relying on you. Plus you’ll get a mid-day mental recharge from the social time.

  3. Get good gear. It’s tempting to use whatever athletic gear you have on hand, but that’s not a good idea, even for a short race. Worn-out or ill-fitting shoes can lead to injury. Go to a specialty running store to get fit for a pair of shoes that offers the support you need. While you’re there, pick up apparel made of technical materials that wicks sweat away from your skin, keeping you cool on hot training days.

  4. Eat like an athlete. What you consume will have a huge impact on how you feel while you’re on the road. It’s hard to log a peak performance if you’ve got a belly full of junk food. Wholesome, unprocessed foods will help you unleash your strength and speed. Figure out which pre-run foods will boost your energy without upsetting your stomach.  Resist the temptation to eat with abandon. It’s easy to eat back all the calories you just burned – and then some— end up at the starting line heavier.  Sip water, or other calorie-free fluids throughout the day to make sure you’re well hydrated going into each workout. Dehydration has been proven to drag down pace and make even easy runs feel difficult.

  5. Ask for help. Any time you have questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. Our team of USATF, USAT, and RRCA-certified coaches are here to answer your questions on training, nutrition, and injuries. Contact us any time by tapping “Support” from the App, or emailing us at coach@movecoach.com.

We’re looking forward to taking the J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge SFO with you on September 7. Be sure to look for us on race day.  Click here to get to know the Movecoach Team!



Here at Movecoach, the JP Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge San Francisco is a tradition that we look forward to each September. Though we walk and run at a wide variety of paces, as we prepare together as a team—celebrating one another’s successes, and commiserating about setbacks—we forge bonds that wouldn’t have been possible during regular office hours.

Meet the Movecoach team, and be sure to come say hello on race day!

Let Movecoach design a training plan for the event that’s personalized to fit your current level of fitness, and workout schedule. Click here to learn more.

Tom McGlynn, Founder and CEO 
tomrunning_smallest
Movecoach CEO and founder Tom McGlynn will be running in his eighth Corporate Challenge.  “I love lining up just before the gun and seeing former colleagues, friends and other runners,” he says.  His race goals: to run faster than at least 1,000 runners who are 20 years younger, then dash back to the course to finish with Movecoach engineers, Charles and Aaron. Like so many Movecoach Challengers, for Tom, running means way more than anything that could be measured on a finish-line clock. He relies on running to manage stress and think more clearly. “If I don’t run, I’m completely non-productive and often times unbearable for co-workers and family members,” he says. “Running literally keeps me going.”

Cori Tresser, Head of Marketing
cori
This will be Cori’s fifth year in the Challenge. She’s aiming to get to the starting line—and the finish—feeling fit,  fresh, and running her best. But even beyond the finishing times, she loves the benefits that a regular exercise routine bestows. “Exercise— whether I’m doing my Pure Barre Class or running outside for a few miles— makes me feel wonderful,” she says. “I usually feel like I can do anything after a good exercise session (that only lasts about 20 minutes).”




Aaron Bentley, Application Engineer

aaroncristina Aaron will be participating in his first Corporate Challenge. He started walking last year with his fiance, Cristina, when they adopted their dog Zoe. Now he cherishes that time to unplug from work, and reconnect. “It’s a time for me to unwind with Cristina and our dog, Zoe,” he says. “It gives us time to talk about our days without the distraction of technology.” Aaron plans to walk the event, finish in under an hour, and meet some Movecoach clients along the way.


Sarah Lippitt, Data Scientist

sarahrunningphoto 1Sarah ran the Corporate Challenge for the first time last year. Her favorite part is the finish line. As a night owl, she especially appreciates the fact that the race occurs inthe evening—those are rare! 

She’ll wait to set a goal until the week before the race, “when I know where the summer training has taken me,” she says. Sarah loves the spectacle of large running events. But she also enjoys how training helps her discover and explore new places she’s never been before. “I like to create new routes for either a run or bike ride and find new scenes and places that I otherwise may not come across,” she says. “I also like to create GPS art. Completing the picture will definitely keep me going!”

Brett Miller, Director of Business Development
brettson
 Brett will be participating in his fourth JP Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge. “My favorite part of the event is meeting lots of other people from different companies who are working towards making fitness a part of their lives,” he says.  “Through our clients, Movecoach has a ton of employees participating.  Getting to meet them, and hear their stories is a great part of the event.” Brett’s goal this year: To have fun and feel like he performed well.

But like so many Movecoach participants, the real rewards come on the way to the starting line. “When I can consistently get out for a 30 to 60- minute run, lots of other things start falling into place,” says Brett. “ I get time to clear my head, my body feels better, and I start to see real improvements in my running too!”


Ashley Benson, Head of Product
ashleyrunningphotoAshley will be running in her fourth JP Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge. “My favorite part of the event is the camaraderie and team spirit that the race inspires amongst the Movecoach team,” she says. Her goal: to contribute to a mixed team title, and to be among the top female finishers in the race. But running holds so many rewards, even beyond the finish line, namely, “the feeling of accomplishment when I’ve achieved a goal,” she says. “ It’s addicting!” 





Charles DeWald, Senior Application Engineer

charlesCharles has completed the event twice before. For him, the event presents a great opportunity to see the scenic lower part of the city that he doesn’t get to see during his normal workday routine. The time he puts into working out on a regular basis gives him a strength and resolve that shines into so many other corners of his life. “Finishing a workout—regardless of how you feel—builds mental toughness,” Charles says. “And that’s always in demand.”



The JP Morgan Challenge
San Francisco is Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 7:15 PM. For all the details about the event, click here.


Have questions? Contact us!





























A lot of people put off pursuing a goal, waiting some time to materialize when work is calm, home life isn’t hectic, and there’s plenty of time to train. Not Shanley Roach. She trained for Grandma’s Marathon, even as she navigated a major life change and a move. “My training wasn't perfect, but I trusted my body and just went for it come race day!”

shanleyroach 1Name: Shanley Roach

Major milestone: I recently just ran my very first marathon, Grandma's Marathon, whoohoo! It was amazing and so much fun and I can't wait to run my next marathon!

What is the secret to your success? Persevering through whatever comes at you in life. A major lesson I learned is that your training is not going to be perfect. Life throws things at you and it’s okay!

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? In the month leading up to my race, I graduated from my undergraduate college, moved cities, and started graduate school. I didn't train to as much mileage as I had hoped to do because of all this, but I still tried to run what I could leading up to the race and never gave up even when I didn't think I would make it to race day.

What is the most rewarding part of training? The moment that I increased my weekly training pace. I always considered myself a slower runner, so nothing felt more rewarding than realizing I could bump up my training pace. My long runs were still the same speed, but I was able to run faster during the week and feel comfortable with it. It was a major high point of training!

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Just keep running. And also do some lifting. Your hamstrings, knees, and IT Band  will Thank you.. Make sure your quads and hamstrings/glutes are proportionate in their strength! And Foam roll every day because it seriously will makes a difference after only 2 weeks.

Click here to learn more about the Grandma's Marathon & Half Marathon Training Program.

Have a running story to share?
Click here for details.

Download our App for iOS or Android.


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rc_runcoachsuccess_houston_doncraig

Don Craig didn't even start running until he was in his late 30s, and ran his first marathon when he was 45.  In just five years, he's finished four marathons and qualified for Boston twice, including at the 2017 Houston Marathon. Now, he's headed for the 2018 Boston Marathon, which falls on his 50th birthday. He's also aiming for a sub-3:20 finish at the New York City Marathon in December.

 "There have been times I've looked at my Runcoach plan for the week, especially in the last third of the marathon training, and told my family 'I have no idea how I will do that,'" he says. "But when I do, it is an amazing feeling of validation of the work put in to that point."

Don Craig
Sport: Running

What is the secret to your success? The most important has been finding a plan and sticking to it, almost religiously.  The Runcoach program has given me the variety and challenge needed to get me to not be stagnant.  But also, there is not enough said about visualizing your success on race day.  For my first BQ in Fargo (my 2nd full marathon) I had visualized the clock reading 3:22 as I came down the last block. I thought of that for weeks.  Sure enough, I turned the corner that day and saw the clock ahead and it said 3:22.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Life is the biggest obstacle.  With a family, a demanding job, travel, and spouse, just like all of us, getting in the hours is tough.  I've learned I do best if I get up at crazy hours (like 4:30 am) so I can get 'er done before the rest of my life has to begin. When I travel, the first thing I check is what running gear I will need, even before the work clothes.  And I hold myself accountable.  If I decide to sleep in when I was supposed to run, then I fit it in later that day.  Sometimes that means I am now running in hot humid conditions or it’s snowing (it's Boston), but that is my self-imposed punishment.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Set high goals.  Everyone thought I was nuts setting a goal to qualify for the Boston Marathon, since I was 45 years old, and had only run one full marathon.  Now my goal is a sub 3:20 marathon in NYC in November and to BQ in Boston on my 50th birthday.  Set the goal, set the plan and execute. Anything is possible.

Have a running story to share? Click here for details.

Download our App for iOS or Android.


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 With our system, you can design a training plan that's customized to fit your current level of activity and fitness. Get started with just 5 easy steps.

1. Identify yourself.  
Go to the Settings, and identify what kind of athlete you are.

2. Plug in your goal. On the Goals and Results Page, select “+NEW GOAL."

3. Tell us about a racing history. Click  “+NEW RACE” and plug in a recent race time.

4. Design your workout schedule. On the Schedule & History page,  tell us about how much exercise you’re currently doing, and tell us when you’d like to workout and rest.

5. Sync your activity tracker. Movecoach syncs with many popular activity trackers. When you sync your service, and your miles will automatically be uploaded to your Movecoach log. Movecoach syncs with Garmin, Strava, AppleWatch, RunKeeper, Fitbit, Nike+, and Jawbone. To learn more, click here.

6. Ask for help. Our experts and coaches are here to answer your questions about training, nutrition, and technical issues.  Reach out to us by tapping Support on your Mobile App or writing to us at coach@movecoach.com


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