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maggieflanaganjpgMaggie  Flanagan

Major milestone: I completed my first Marathon—the 42nd Marine Corps Marathon.

What is the secret to your success? Perseverance

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Injuries. I spent tons of money on [doctors]! Illness in the last month leading up to the race meant no training and changing my goals. I switched my race goal. I focused on just finishing, instead of the time goal that my training had indicated was achievable.

What is the most rewarding part of training? The workout sessions that I was able to complete with others. Solo training is such hard work!

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Train with others.  Complete all your workout sessions - including strength & conditioning.Be realistic about what you can achieve, but don’t be afraid to change if life gets in the way.

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Name: Rosaleen Dillon


rosaleen dillonMajor milestone:
I finished the 2017 Dublin Marathon in 3:57:32. At the end of June I signed up with my 6 brothers to complete the Dublin Marathon. When I entered my 10-K pace, the estimated time was 4:17. I'm glad to say, that with the help of Runcoach , I finished in 3:57:32. (Thank you Runcoach!) So next year, a 3:55 for BQ [Boston Qualifying Time] for Boston is within my reach!

What is the secret to your success? Stick to the plan, be patient and commit to it.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Believe you can! One day, something just clicked, I felt terrible at warm up, but the big workout ended up being the best!

What is the most rewarding part of training? Seeing the improvements and knowing you CAN make it through.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Get the daily reminders. It helped keep me focused. But knowing my weekly schedule helped me arrange my runs with work, kids, etcI loved when my schedule adjusted when I reached a new level of fitness. It gave me encouragement! Also, the coaches are always there to answer questions and give encouragement.  I signed up for Runcoach so that I can keep training. I'm not able to train with a club and Runcoach has helped me in every aspect.

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rc success mitch gottlieb_smallMitchell Gottlieb

Major milestone: Marine Corps Marathon finisher

What is the secret to your success? Make a plan and stick to it.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? At 55 years old, it was a challenging age to pick up running and decide to run a marathon. Running in the Marine Corps Marathon helped to inspire me on my runs and having my wife push me out the door Monday mornings really helped as well.

What is the most rewarding part of training and the race? Finishing was very rewarding. Running in snow and rain and the look on people's faces as you run by in shorts with a big smile always pumped me up.  Race day was an emotional day. It was 9 days before my 56th birthday. The Marine Corps Marathon honors all Marines who have served to defend our great nation. During the race we ran through Washington, DC and Arlington, Virginia. Running past monuments and buildings with such history was uplifting. Running through a sea of photos of our fallen soldiers lost in too many senseless wars was heart wrenching. Marines lined much of the course and I tried to shake hands and thank as many as I could.

 It was special to have my family cheering me on from multiple locations along the course. They have supported me for the last six months of training. They motivated me on days when I did not want to run, They worried about me when my long runs ran too long and always tried to get me to stretch. 

The most amazing part of the the race was the final .2 miles. Running up the Marine Corps War Memorial hill with cheering crowds and finally passing the finish line. My medal was presented to me by a Marine and finished off with a salute. I was not sure if I should return the salute but did my best after running 26.2 miles. It was a day I will never forget. I'm already looking forward to another marathon.




haleycarwile Haley Carwile

Major milestone: 2017 Marine Corps Marathon 

What is the secret to your success? I followed my Runcoach MCM training program from start to finish -- over 787 running miles!  My secret to success was never giving up.  Even if I had to set my alarm for 3:45 AM to get those long runs in!

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? One week before my race, I sprained my achilles tendon doing a recovery run on the treadmill.  I had never injured myself before and had no idea how it would impact my race.  I rested, iced, and took over the counter painkillers all week and set a personal goal to run the race as best as I could.  I used mental toughness to get through 26.2 miles with an injury.

What is the most rewarding part of training? Seeing results! (I was able to run a 7:30 mile by the end.) Always having something new to try (great workout variation), I loved receiving new workouts each week, and watching the logged miles get higher and higher! Runcoach was amazing through my entire training process.  

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? You are strong.  You are tough.  Stick to the training and TRUST it! 




rc success_haroldpizzettaName: Harold Pizzetta

Major milestone: I qualified for the Boston Marathon!

What is the secret to your success? Using Runcoach took away the need for me to stress over how to and how much to train.  Runcoach allowed me to focus on enjoying running and racing.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Like many, self-doubt and an injury along the way creates a real risk that i would give up on the marathon distance.  My IT band required me to ramp down my running twice while transitioning from half to full.  During the second episode, I was sure that I was not going to achieve marathon distance.  Following the Runcoach schedule brought me back and fully prepared me for the marathon. 

What is the most rewarding part of training? I think back to the transition from half- to full-marathon training.  I was absolutely intimidated by the thought of several 20+ mile Saturday runs.  But, little by little, Runcoach added miles and I held on for the ride.  Reflecting on how far I have come keeps me motivated.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Rest days and easy runs are requirements, just as much as hard workouts and long runs.  The easy runs helped my up my miles per week without serious injury or over-training. 

Anything else you would like to share? As much as I hate to admit it, I think the speed work suggested by the training plan made a great deal of difference.  Those workouts are the most difficult for me, but worth the effort in the end. I have emailed Runcoach for support and suggestions on a few occasions.  Each time, the support was terrific.  In particular, I got some good advice on adjusting my schedule to deal with an injury.



In addition to helping your company reach its Challenge goal, you can provide a powerful example of how moving more can benefit the mind and the body. Invite your coworkers to join the Movecoach Challenge. Once 5 coworkers you invite join, we’ll send you your Movecoach Ambassador gear.

On your mobile device:

1. Tap the Me icon (on the bottom-left corner of your phone screen).
2. Select "More."
3. Select "Invite Coworkers."
4. Send your coworkers an invitation to join Movecoach.

From the web, on a computer:

1. Login.
2. Click on the arrow next to your profile photo on the upper right-hand corner of the screen.
3. Select "Invite Coworkers" from the drop-down menu. 

Click here for tips on how to help a coworker start exercising regularly and stick with it. 

Any questions? Contact us.



Tips for Race Week

September 28, 2017

 

After sacrificing so much time, energy, and sweat to train for your race, the stress in the days before the event can feel overwhelming.

It is easy to get caught up in worrying about what you can’t control—factors like the weather, or how well your training went. But that’s not a good use of your emotional energy.

Focus instead on the many other factors within your control that can make or break your race.

Take the steps below to stress less on race week and arrive at the starting line feeling fit, fresh, and ready to run your best.


Hydrate. Dehydration can sap your performance, and make any pace feel harder. Prevent dehydration by consuming plenty of fluids  in the days before the race.  Aim to consume half your body weight in ounces each day. So if you weigh 160 pounds, try to drink 80 ounces of water or other calorie-free drinks each day. If you weigh 120 pounds, aim for 60 ounces. Sip fluids in small doses throughout the day. Pounding drinks right before a workout, or the race, could cause GI distress.

Eat well. Stick with the foods that have worked well during training and given you a boost without upsetting your stomach. Avoid any new foods or meals with spicy foods in the day before the race—you don’t to risk GI distress. There’s  no need to carb-load for a 5-K or a 10-K. But to ensure that you have plenty of fuel when the starting gun fires, in the days before the race make sure that there are plenty of wholesome carb-rich foods in your meals.

Review the course. Review the race course online, or better yet drive or run on stretches of the course in the days before the race. Take mental notes on where you’ll have to push and where you can cruise. Visualize yourself crossing the finish line feeling composed, strong, and exhilarated.

Get your gear out.  It’s tempting to try something new to honor the special occasion of the big day. But it’s not a good idea. A gear or wardrobe malfunction before or during the race can throw off your focus and end up derailing the day you’ve been preparing so hard for. Plan to race in the shoes, apparel, gear, and gadgets that have been reliable in training.

Review your logistics.  What are your plans for picking up your race packet? How will you get to the race in the morning and get home afterwards? Where will you park? Make a plan, write it down, and stick to it. Spending time to nail down these logistics will help relieve stress on race morning.

Get some rest. Avoid the temptation to cram extra miles or intense workouts in the final days before the race.  Your fitness on race day is the result of the cumulative effect of all the workouts you’ve done over weeks and months. It’s unlikely that any workout you do in the week of the event will propel you to a PR. And by pushing the pace or the mileage right before the race, you risk getting injured, and sidelined from a goal you’ve worked so hard and long to achieve. Use the days before the race to rest, run easy, and get plenty of shuteye. Aim for at least seven hours of sleep per night.

Review your training log. Add up all the miles you logged to train for this big event. Take note of all the times you pushed yourself out the door for a tough workout when you would have rather stayed in. Draw confidence from all that you accomplished on the way to the starting line. Anyone can show up on race day. But it takes months of dedication, sacrifice, and hard work to train for it and get your body and mind into shape to give that race your all. Take some time to reflect on some of the major milestones and highlights of your running life so far—say the first time you completed a mile, ran five miles, broke a new personal best, or hit a pace that once felt impossible. Savor that success. Use those memories, and that pride to fuel your confidence heading into race day.

Review your goals.  Have a few time goals in mind that are realistic based on how your training went. Consider the miles you logged, how healthy you feel, and any aches or pains you may have accumulated along the way. If you set a goal at the outset of training, but work, life, illness or injury got in the way, save that goal for another day. It is far better to go in with a conservative goal and surprise yourself than to go into a race with vaunted unrealistic expectations that ultimately lead to disappointment. In addition to setting time goals, be sure to set consider objectives that aren’t so tied to the numbers on the finish-line clock. You might aim to run up the hills you previously walked, try to perfectly execute your fueling plan, or run each mile within 10 to 20 seconds of the previous mile. Or you might try to do a negative split—that is, finish the second half the race faster than the first half.





Mike Portman ran a blazing 2:53 in his first marathon this year. Now, he's using Runcoach to train for California International Marathon and the Boston Marathon. And he's set his sights on a sub-2:50 finish.


Mike PortmanName: Mike Portman

Major milestone: I finished my first marathon in 2:53 at the 2016 Chicago Marathon. 

What is the secret to your success? To treat training like it is a 24/7 job. That means running, strength, good nutrition, hydration, sleep, and trying to keep your life as stress free as possible.

What is the biggest obstacle to reaching your goals and how do you get over it? Trying to prioritize what in my life is important that can be delayed till the training program is over. When the volume gets very high I focus on the big things that always need to be taken care of (such as work and family). Other things (like my social life), I push back till my racing has calmed down.

What is the most rewarding part of training? The satisfaction of getting the work done day in and day out.

What advice would you give to other members of the Runcoach community? Stick to the plan, but don't be religious about it. The plan itself is solid but training is organic. If you can't hit certain splits, distances, or times once in a while don't be too down on yourself.  Just do what you can day to day and the results will follow.

Anything else you would like to share?  I’m training for the California International Marathon and then the Boston Marathon. Hopefully both will be solid PR's from Chicago! This plan for CIM has been lot harder than Chicago's but that's probably because now I know what I can do and so far my form is coming along. I’m definitely way more prepared than anyone I know currently training for that race. I’m hoping to go sub 2:50 and right now I think that's doable with 10 weeks to go.




In the spotlight: Visa Moves 300,000 Miles Challenge
Stephen Tsoi-A-Sue
Stock Plan Analyst/Human Resources

mc_success_stephenFavorite Fitness Activity: Rock Climbing and Bouldering

What is the secret to your success? Finding an active hobby. That way it feels like you're having fun and not exercising.

What is the biggest obstacle to moving more and how do you overcome it? The biggest obstacle to moving more is finding the time. It's easy to get caught up with work and life in general. I consider my future health and see my actions now as the foundation for a long happy healthy life. With this in mind it's always a priority to get out and do something.

What is the most rewarding part of this challenge? Running more often. I started running again around April of this year, and usually run two to three times per week. I was really into distance running in the past but stopped for some years. It feels good to get back into a rhythm again. I was training for the San Francisco Half Marathon. I was doing runs on my own but the Wednesday runs hosted by Movecoach kept me on track and motivated me to keep training.  I am not training for any events right now but I would like to do another half marathon next year.


Share your Movecoach success story here! 

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