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Dena Evans

Dena Evans

Dena Evans joined runcoach in July, 2008 and has a wide range of experience working with athletes of all stripes- from youth to veteran division competitors, novice to international caliber athletes.

From 1999-2005, she served on the Stanford Track & Field/ Cross Country staff. Dena earned NCAA Women’s Cross Country Coach of the Year honors in 2003 as Stanford won the NCAA Division I Championship. She was named Pac-10 Cross Country Coach of the Year in 2003-04, and West Regional Coach of the Year in 2004.

From 2006-08, she worked with the Bay Area Women’s Sports Initiative, helping to expand the after school fitness programs for elementary school aged girls to Mountain View, East Menlo Park, and Redwood City. She has also served both the Stanford Center on Ethics and the Stanford Center on the Legal Profession as a program coordinator.

Dena graduated from Stanford in 1996.

nervousAt runcoach, we work with thousands of new runners taking aim at their very first half marathon or marathon.  Our goal is to provide you a training path toward success in all of your running endeavors, but as you get started, there are things to avoid, including the following …

 

Don’t change everything at once – make sustainable transitions

Many runners choose to start on the road to an ambitious goal because of a milestone, a health concern, or similar “wake-up call.”  These motivations are strong, but making wholesale amounts of huge changes to your life all at once can result in commitments that don’t stand the test of time.  Embrace the challenges and positive energy provided by the added training – we’ll make sure to give you a progressive plan. Piece by piece, examine the additional areas you want to take on with an incremental approach.

 

Take running advice with a grain of salt

Yes, this sounds strange to warn against taking a lot of advice by giving advice, but the truth is, the internet and magazine stand are chock full of tips on how to build speed, burn fat, eat well, shape your abs, shape your butt, stretch your pinky toe (or don’t stretch your pinky toe at all!) and everything else.  With so much advice out there, it is easy to be overwhelmed about what you should trust.  Many of these advice sources are good, but again, it is not a great idea to take one of absolutely every dish from the buffet.  Keep a file of interesting articles and advice, and over time begin to get a more detailed picture of the types of dietary, ancillary, and other changes might be most helpful to you, leaving aside the more tangential advice for future goal race campaigns.

 

Your five year-old fitness shoes may not be up for the task

Shoes degrade both by use and over time.  While the many different styles of shoes can require some shopping, it is worth making sure that your feet are comfortable and prepared to handle the growing length of your runs.  A pair of shoes that has served as your “running shoes” for many years of sporadic casual use is probably not going to be the best springboard for a healthy and successful goal race campaign.  Invest in some well-fitting running shoes and hopefully in doing so, gird yourself against many potential injury problems.

 

Running can help regulate sleep, but it also requires sleep!

Many new runners or others embarking on their first sustained exercise regimen report the regulative effect running can have on sleep habits.  However, the maintenance of a progressive training plan will require adequate rest.  Your body will need to be stressed in order to be prepared to handle a long race. It will need to recover in order to adapt and be prepared to be stressed again.  Prioritize sleep to get the most out of the work you are putting in.

 

Don’t pick a goal race more than a year or less than a couple months ahead

Picking a race to far into the future can decrease the level of your immediate commitment to the task, where as a goal too close can encourage going over the top and getting injured as you press on toward a goal you wish was a few weeks or months later.  3-6 months is a great sweet spot for a half marathon, with half a year to a year allowing a relaxed and thorough buildup for a goal marathon.  Successful campaigns can most definitely be had with varying timelines, but choosing a horizon that matches your need for a particularly paced buildup can greatly increase your chances for finishing successfully!

 

Santa_Hustle_5k_14The red coffee cups are out at Starbucks and the Christmas carols are playing in stores.  The holidays are certainly almost upon us, which for many runners means some disruption in the daily running routine.

 

For many of our runcoach athletes, this may mean some time off, either due to vacation or unexpectedly busy weeks.  Many athletes want to plan ahead by blocking off time in their schedules, but we encourage runners to log what actually occurred as it happens or upon return, and let the system then adjust for the appropriate course moving forward.  Prioritizing long runs and pace runs can often allow a sparse period for daily running to elapse without too much loss in fitness progress.  Our hope is to encourage you to do anything you can do, and not be discouraged if you can’t complete the entire schedule on a given week or two.

 

Over the last few years, we have given some advice on coming through the holiday season like a champ.  If you are viewing the upcoming months with trepidation about all the changes the season may bring, read some of our tips and reflections and take heart – you are not alone!

 

The holidays require some flexibility and a positive attitudeRead about some basic strategies for surviving the holidays with your goals intact.

 

Big storm on the way?  Holed up in a much colder environment?  Read on about how to weather the weather and still be productive in your running.

 

If you are going to need to run in the dark, don’t leave the house without our tips!

 

Need to cross train in the gym or pool? Which cross training discipline is the best for you?

 

Want to chuckle at some of Coach Dena’s personal reflections on running in bad weather and when on family vacations? Read on here and here!

 

If you are hoping to start the new year with some resolutions, here are some tips for actually sticking to them!

 

Most importantly, take a deep breath, keep a sense of humor, and fix your eyes on the horizon.  You can do it!

 

 

 

tired_runner

 

At runcoach, we love celebrating the great race results that roll in after each weekend.  Although sensible training and belief can ensure that many race days proceed well, occasionally an off day or an unexpected turn of events affects us all.

 

One of the best ways to recover from a tough race is to have a short memory.  In every race, there are many things a runner can control:  clothing choices, food choices, pacing choices, fueling choices, and more.  Likewise, there are several factors that are beyond the control of the athlete:  the weather that may prove those clothing choices to be wise, the digestive system that may repudiate those food choices, the topography or wind that may prove those pacing choices to be miscalculated and events like an unexpected bathroom need or unseasonably humid weather which may show the fueling choices to be inadequate.  Because we really do not control quite as much on race day as we believe we do, it is unproductive to dwell on a disappointing result when it was significantly affected by one of these factors.

 

Certainly, we also know there are times when we weren’t quite as tough as we had envisioned, when the effort given seemed monumental at the time, but retrospect asks the question, “Was there more in the tank?”  In these times just as well, we need to avoid miring ourselves in what could have been and focus on what we plan to do next time out.

 

Because running is a singular pursuit, requires such strong task commitment both over the long training cycle as well as during a race effort, and the sense of accomplishment is so great when done well, runners often have a hard time divorcing our overall confidence from one or two tough days out of many.  But, we should.  Difficult things by definition would be easy if everyone could do them, and running long distance is most definitely a difficult thing.  Without minimizing the value of finishing a large goal or glamorizing the somewhat sanitized notion that the victory is only in attempting to begin, if you have trained well for a goal race, you have should have satisfaction for what you have learned about yourself along that journey.  A race completed, but not as fast as expected, is a race where the spirit of perseverance yielded a finishing result, which on a better day would be the type of commitment that will indeed lead to a PR.  If Murphy’s Law prevailed on a particular day, you have a great story and a lesson of resilience in the face of a gauntlet of unexpected difficulties.

 

Sometimes, the tough day has definite antecedents in choices we have made or training that trended less positively than we would have hoped leading in.  This is where the running log enters into the conversation.  When the dust is settled, an examination of any correctable factors is well in order, but always in the context of fact versus feelings.  Beating oneself up over situations that can neither be redone nor controlled next time is not productive.  Preparing to do battle with more training, a mellowed sense of humor, and a renewed sense of hope is crucial.  Carrying the burdens of a previous tough race is a heavy load.  If you are able to leave that load and focus on the opportunity ahead rather than the unrealized promise of a previous race, you have the opportunity for a much more positive experience.  Running toward a goal is always more productive than running away from a fear. Daily, practice focusing on the run at hand, the potential of the present day, and the joy or challenge of the experience presently underway.  Have a short memory, and in doing so, you’ll leave more room for new ones!

 

When post-goal race elation subsides and the physical recovery period is well underway, many runners have a difficult time turning the corner toward the next horizon.  Some athletes come away from a goal race so hungry for the next one that they over-enthusiastically barrel down the road toward the next goal without giving their bodies ample time to rest. Instead, for many runners, a huge bucket list item is a hard act to follow, even if we know that goal setting has finally allowed us to move the needle on long sought hopes.

 

The knowledge that the physical challenge of a long race can be described as a “how” rather than the “if” it was the first time is a powerful tool. Addressing the “how” requires a bit of work above the shoulders, both before and during the races ahead.  We’ve written about a few of these topics on the blog, including the areas listed below:

 

 

At runcoach, we love to see runners break through and achieve their goals week after week, but we know sometimes the immediate road ahead has a focus on general fitness rather than a big goal race.  We are here for you either way, and your individualized program can adjust to meet your needs for the run tomorrow as well as your destination goal race in 2014!

large-running-race-start-lineDeck the halls with gel and sports drink – fa la la la la, la la la la!

 

‘Tis the season for a goal race. It is natural to get a bit nervous, especially if you have a lot of little questions about how to handle race day.  Before you tuck yourself into bed on the night before with visions of sugar plums and finish lines dancing in your head, stay ahead of a few key things that many first timers need to know, and many experienced racers need to remember.

 

Avoid overeating like crazy on the night before

Many athletes have heard of the term “carbo loading” and believe that means stuffing an entire pound of pasta down the hatch on the night before the race.   It is true marathons require plenty of fuel, and it is also true that carbs are very helpful toward this task.  However, it is also true that a body cannot process four times the  normal amount of food in the same amount of time.  If you eat more food than your body can digest and process helpfully, where will it go?  Where will the excess end up?  Ponder….. Eat until full, but not until explosion levels!

 

Don’t drink two gallons of water 24 hours before the race

Hydration is important, but with too much water, the bloodstream can be stripped of important electrolytes, a potentially VERY dangerous situation on race day.  Hydrate consciously with a mix of water and sports drink or other fluid containing electrolytes for several days before the race so you aren’t pounding large bottles at the expo on the day before.  When your urine is light yellow, nearly clear, just keep sipping so your bladder isn’t under duress with an excess amount of fluid on race morning.

 

Bring throw-away clothing to the start

If it is cold, cold-ish, wet, or wet-ish, an extra layer can be very helpful at the start, particularly if you are in the second wave of a large race and you are going to be standing there for 30-40 minutes, shivering and nervously fidgeting.  “But wait,” you say, “It is supposed to clear up and be nice by the finish so I don’t want to bring my nice zip down.”  Fine, but that’s not an excuse to freeze for three quarters of an hour before you even start running.  Bring a long sleeved shirt that was already headed for Goodwill, and toss it to the curb with the rest of the detritus at the start or after a few warming miles with a hearty “Job well done!” Yes, you will look like a dork, but you will be a warm dork.

 

You must eat before you run a marathon

Is it physically possible to run a marathon without breakfast?  Probably.  Is this something you want to do, even if “I don’t normally have time to eat before my morning runs so I didn’t want to start now.”  No. Way.  This is folly.  If you don’t normally have time to eat, you must consciously change that practice and figure out what works for you in the weeks leading up to the race so you have some fuel in the tank on race day.  The nerves, the waiting at the start, the length of the run and the wait until you have food afterwards – not eating is unwise.  Extremely unwise.  Have a good day, and get something that works for you down the hatch.  No excuses.

Likewise, you must drink during a marathon

Again, is it possible to do it without drinking?  Yes.  Is this smart? Not in the least.  Don’t pick race day to be a hero for water conservation.  Drink 6-8 oz of water and sports drink (alternate!) every 45 minutes or so, if need be in the form of several small splashes from a few fluids stations.  You will have a much more enjoyable time, probably get across the line more quickly, and have a much, much more enjoyable recovery.

Do not switch horses mid-stream

Well yes, riding horses is probably cheating.  However, if you have run in one style of shoe, do not change them the day before the race.  Break anything new in three to four weeks before, when you have a chance to do at least one long run in them to find out how they feel.  Shoes, fuel packets, clothing, pre-race dinner, pre-race breakfast – all of these things should be very status quo on race weekend.  Experimentation is for folks who have one under their belt!  Notch this one and then look into switching things up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

large-smiley-facesMany of our members are in the middle of their fall goal race training, building up for a winter race, or tapering for an upcoming red-letter day.  The first big long run of a cycle can be exciting, but training demands a lot from your body.  Occasionally you find yourself waking up a little creaky, taking a bit longer to get up from your chair at work, or stressing out about taking an extra flight of stairs during your taper (shouldn’t your legs feel absolutely perfect ALL DAY, EVERY DAY)?  If you are in midst of or on the cusp of tapering, take a peek at our tips for a successful taper.  However, if you are in the middle of a big cycle and don’t feel quite as fresh as you did at the start, take a moment and refresh yourself with one of these quick tips!

 


Get up

Nothing builds creaki-ness more than a 2-hour run followed by 8 hours straight in a chair, staring at the computer.  Make sure to regularly get up and walk around during the course of your day (once an hour is a good rule), whether it is spent in the office, behind the wheel, or in an otherwise mostly stationary position.  The blood flow is good for your recovery, and the resetting of your scenery can be good for your outlook.

 

Drink Water

Many runners are very conscientious on race day or long run day, but don’t have the same commitment to hydration on the average Tuesday.  If you are making repeated demands on your body, prepare it best by keeping your body well –hydrated even on days when the pressure is off.  Keep a glass of water just small enough to need refilling regularly.  Buy a bulk pack of your favorite non-caffeinated beverage and keep it cool in the fridge.  Even if you don’t like water, give yourself a healthy source of hydration to look forward to.  You’ll get your walk and your water at the same time.

 

Stop, Drop, and Roll

Yes, do exactly this.   Although foam rolling can be inconvenient in work clothes and locations, keep one around.  If you have a moment and a quiet, carpeted corner, the loose muscles gained can provide a new lease on the rest of the day.  If you don’t keep one handy, you can’t do it.  Keep one under the desk.

 

Take a mini sleep-cation

The race is eight weeks away, and in your mind, you only need to concentrate on sleep the week of.  However, at least half the battle of the race is getting to the start line in the best shape you can be.  Life may not allow you to get a solid 8 hours each night, but if feeling run-down, take 2-3 nights where you commit to an earlier bedtime.  Call it a race week rehearsal if you need to justify it to yourself.  You’ll be surprised how much better you’ll feel, so much so it might convince you to carve out more sleep on a regular basis!

 

Go grocery shopping

On your way home tonight, go grocery shopping and get the good stuff.  A steady diet of take out can be both more expensive and less healthy than a load of appealing groceries.  Refresh your fridge with fresh fruits and vegetables.  Food is fuel for all your hard runs.  Fill your tank with food that will help you achieve your goals.  After all, if you opened your fridge and found fresh produce, you might eat it!

 

 

 

 

fast_k8_jacket_cropped

 

Katie Dalzell is the Lead Designer for women’s running apparel company Oiselle. Along with founder and CEO Sally Bergesen, Katie is designing stylish and functional clothes for women from their headquarters in Seattle, where they have been based since Bergesen’s first collection in 2007.  Staffed almost entirely with active female athletes and growing alongside the numbers of female road runners and racers nationwide, Oiselle takes their design seriously, recently showing the spring collection for the first time at New York’s Fashion Week.  This week, we caught up with Dalzell to get a quick bit of insight into the design and production of the young and growing market of running clothes created specifically for women.

 

 

rc: With the huge growth of the numbers of women regularly running and racing, everything from running shorts to commemorative race shirts is beginning to be offered in a "women's fit".  When designing clothes for women, what are the major differences in shape and construction from men's or unisex styles?

 

KD: I am typically not a fan of unisex clothing. Women and men are shaped differently, and so the best fitting clothing will cater to each gender individually! Unisex clothing is generally made to fit a mans body, so it lacks the detailing and fit required to truly flatter a woman's curves and shape. Even women’s apparel with a "boyfriend fit" is designed for women's bodies, and fit on women, to accommodate and flatter our different shapes. So the biggest difference? Boobs and hips, of course!

 

rc: Who or what is your muse as a designer of women's running clothes?  What characteristics capture the women you are designing for?

 

KD: My muse isn't necessarily a single person. At Oiselle, runners and the running community are our driving inspirations, though we believe that running apparel can cross borders into most athletic endeavors, and even daily fashion. I design for strong, healthy and motivated woman who are free thinkers and unapologetic. Oiselle's motto is "FEMININE FIERCE", and all of our designs are wrapped around this idea.

 

rc: When shopping, to what should women pay attention when making a purchase they hope will perform well over hundreds of miles and last for years?

 

KD: Pay attention to the fabric and construction of the garment. Does it look like it was constructed with thought and care? Attention to detail? Attention to detail is very important in the longevity of a garment. Look at the seams and stitching, the finishings (hems, armholes, necklines, etc.). Also look for technical finishes catered to the sport, and well constructed, soft liners. Fabric is just as important. For athletic apparel, look for the technical aspects of the fabric. Synthetic fabrics are currently the best option for running apparel. The majority of quality fabrics used for this purpose are nylon and polyester, often blends, and often with spandex. Blends with synthetic and natural fibers can work well too, such as poly/cotton or poly/rayon blends. Look out for "distressed" finishes (often on jeans), as they can often develop holes easier! Though I believe that when a garment is well loved it can be even more beautiful than brand new! :)

 

rc: What's around the corner for trends in women's running wear?  What can we look forward to?

KD: There has been a gap between fashion and running apparel in the past. Sally recognized the need to combine these two elements to create beautiful, fashion forward but highly technical running apparel, and so Oiselle was born! I'm very excited about the future of running apparel, as there are so many unexplored and unexpected ways to design into this market. It's becoming much more fashion forward and in line with ready to wear trends. Future trends are using technical fabrics in unexpected ways, bridging the gap between ready to wear and athletic apparel. Look forward to modern and edgy styling with bold lines, fabric and texture mixing, and effortlessly chic running apparel that you will want to wear on your longest run, and on a fun day or night out!

 

suitcaseIn the weeks and months ahead, hundreds of thousands of runners will travel to the location of their upcoming goal race.  In previous blog posts, we have touched on how to generally plan your goal race travel and have given advice for family and other supporters on ways they can organize to best effect on race weekend.

 

Before you bundle yourself into the car or head to the airport, take a moment to scan our goal race travel packing list – plan ahead and be prepared with everything you need for a great day!

 

Plan ahead and don’t forget:

 

Shoes

Training shoes and racing shoes, if those differ.  Both should be broken in at least a week or two beforehand.  Neither should ever be checked if flying.  Seems self-explanatory, but in the rush to remember the odd, weird things, sometimes we forget about first things first.

 

Race outfit with cold and hot variations

Make sure your favorite long run shorts and top are in the bag.  For the women, make sure that non-chafing sportsbra is packed.  Think through your options if the weather ends up differently than expected, and pack your favorite tights, hat, arm sleeves or long sleeved shirt, and or gloves.  Do not forget about the socks.

 

Pre race and post race clothes

Throwaways and/or warm clothes might be needed before the race, and will be very likely welcome after the race.  An extra pair of dry socks in the bag can really help your post-race spirits as well.  If the weather is cold, a hooded top or a beanie can really help when the post-race chill sets after when the body temperature drops following the race.

 

Snacks/ mid race fuel

Even if the race has your favorite brands offered on the course, it is helpful to have packed some favorite snacks and fueling options in case you miss the table, drop your item, or just want to top off your tank before or after the race.

 

Roller or rolling / stretching device

Watch

Bodyglide

Sunscreen

Water bottle

…and / or fuel carrying device for the day if using one

Something to sit on, such as a blanket or old finish area space blanket

…for the pre and post race area if no chairs or benches are available

Travel first aid kit

…hobbling around the hotel looking for a band-aid can and should be avoided

Earplugs  and eye shade

….or anything else that might help with a better night’s sleep before the race

Preferred breakfast food

…if packable – save time and money on race morning

 

While this list probably doesn’t cover every need for every athlete, checking off the major items early in the packing process can alleviate stress and allow time to remember some of the more individualized items each runner hopes to not leave home without.

 

 

UntitledUnless you have taken barefoot running to extreme measures, each of us will periodically need new running shoes.  Increase your chances of a successful experience with a few of our tips….

 

If you are starting a running program for the first time….

If you have registered for a goal race as a catalyst to finally begin regular running and you are raring to get started on your runcoach plan, it is important to make sure your shoes won’t impede your progress and slow the momentum of your enthusiasm and motivation.  Although price might be an important factor in your choice, a huge box sporting goods store can be a frustratingly large array of styles and colors if not accompanied by a knowledgeable sales person.  Even if you do not eventually make your purchase there, a local specialty running store is usually staffed by employees who spend their days working exclusively with runners and running shoes and can usually provide more insightful feedback and advice on what shoe might be right for you.  Many of these shoes will provide some gait analysis and allow you to take the shoes for a bit of test running.  Take advantage of these services and make an informed choice.

 

If you have had a hard time getting a pair of shoes that still feel good a week after leaving the store…

Consider shopping for shoes in the late afternoon or evening, when you have been on your feet for extended periods of time.  Your feet will be a little bit bigger from all that upright blood flow, and you can be sure that at their chunkiest, your shoes will still fit.  Although toenails may be lost along the road of marathon training, too-small shoes can leave the feet much worse for wear.

 

If you know what you like and price is most important…

Although both small and large retailers can have great deals on your favorite shoes or ones you might like to try, if you know what you want and are sticking with a brand and model, consider buying online, particularly if you can purchase from a retailer with free shipping and/or free returns.  Moreover, if you know what you like, consider buying two or more pairs if on sale as companies are infamous for changing the design and thus the ride and fit of popular shoe models!

 

If your favorite shoe is no longer available….

Bring it with you to the store, in order to give your salesperson a good idea of what you were wearing before, as well as the nature of your wear pattern on the soles.  With any luck, they can direct you toward a shoe that will suit you just as or almost as well.

 

If your legs regularly tell you that you need new shoes before you think of it yourself….

Note in your runcoach training log when you start a pair of shoes, and make sure to take stock and plan ahead before you get to 300 miles.  Most shoes will last 300-500 miles.  Don’t risk injury – plan ahead and shop before your shoes are on their last mile.  Also consider rotating shoes to multiply the number of runs you get consistently on modestly or moderately worn shoes.  A shoe can use a day to decompress and dry out between runs.

 

If you enjoy being adventurous…

Then go on an adventurous run!  If possible, however, avoid buying a brand new first year model.  Once a shoe has been extensively wear tested by others, advice and feedback often help that shoe move closer to ideal the second or third time around.  If you can avoid being a guinea pig, you might also avoid an injury.

 

Siberianicemarathon

Ever feel frustrated about the limitations of your human body?  Ever wonder what you have in common with the Olympians atop the marathon podium?

 

Although most of us may not be able to break the tape in front of a stadium full of people, there are amazing feats accomplished by every day people all the time.  Here are a few extreme performances to captivate your imagination.  Find your strength and your niche, and you never know, you could be on this list!

 

You're Never too old to start!

In just over eight hours, Fauja Singh completed the 2011 Toronto Waterfront Marathon at age 100.  He was rather fresh, however, as he just started competing at the ripe young age of 89.

 

The conditions don’t have to stop you!

If you think your region gets cold in winter, be encouraged you aren’t training for the Siberian Ice Marathon.  800 participants are expected to converge in Omsk, Siberia on January 7 for a half marathon in temperatures that average -20°--40° C.  In 2000 Jay Tuck became the first American to finish the race, and in 2001, the temperature of -42° C meant that of the 223 registered participants, 134 showed up to the starting line and a mere 11 finished.  Hard core! (Photo credit:  My Next Run)

 

Diluted sports drink still too much for your stomach?  Avoid this race…

Each year since 2004, Raleigh, North Carolina runners have contested the Krispy Kreme challenge, consisting of 2.5 miles out, a stop to consume a full dozen doughnuts, and 2.5 miles back.  Keep it all down and do it under an hour to earn prizes.  Demonstrating both internal and external fortitude this year, Tim Ryan did all that in a winning 31:30.

 

Carry a golf club, set a record!

Chris Smith is the current Speedgolf record holder with a 5 under 65 in 44 minutes (scoring is done by adding score and time), but this year, Olympic medalists Bernard Lagat and Nick Willis are headed to the World Championships in Oregon (October 26 and 27).  Will the ability to run a sub 3:50 mile make the difference and lower the current 18-hole record?  We’ll have to tune into find out!  For the ladies, the top finisher last year was Gretchen Johnson with an 84 / 55:16.

 

Good at downhill running?

If you are good at downhills, take a look at the Everest Marathon…that is if you can endure a start altitude of over 17,000 feet!  This race goes from 17,149 to 11,300 feet.  If you can make it through the cold and the altitude effects, you might be able to challenge the Nepalese athlete who ran 3:41 for the win last year.

 

Even if you aren’t fast, you’re still an athlete!

Kelly Gneiting needed over nine hours to complete the 2011 Los Angeles Marathon (memorable for extremely rainy, windy conditions), which may seem pretty slow until you factor in his weight – 430 lbs!  A sumo wrestler, Gneiting destroyed the old record of 275 lbs. (according to the LA Times, he weighed in a 396 after the race).  While we recommend following the advice of medical professionals when taking on extreme challenges to the body, we have to admire his mental toughness to improve on his personal best by 2 hours (from 11:52 to 9:48) in the process.

 

Want to set a Guinness World Record?  Make one up and set it yourself!

The Virgin Money London Marathon has become famous for fast times, but toward the back of the pack, even more records are set each year in a long list of irreverent, but yes, official world records.  As a sampling, the 2011 edition featured records set in the categories of: fastest marathon run by a person dressed as Mr. Potato Head, a sailor, a nurse (male), as a bottle (male), as an astronaut, as a vegetable (female), as a Viking, as a lifeguard, in a police uniform, as a Roman solider (3:09!), wearing a gas mask, in a wedding dress, in an animal costume (female), as a television character (female), as a fairy (male), as a fairy (female), as Dennis the Menace (3:02!), as a cartoon character (Fred Flinstone for 2:46 – smoking!), as a book character, as an ostrich, as a jester, as a super hero (2:42 for the win), as a nun, carrying a 40lb pack, carrying a 60lb pack, moving on crutches (one leg), and number of solved Rubik’s Cubes (that would be 100 in 4:45 for the finish).

 

Don’t see your favorite fancy dress outfit here?  Looking for a way to let your particular skill set shine?  Check the book, find the race that fits your passion, and set your own kind of personal best and world record next time out!

 

 

 

 

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