Forgot username?     |     Forgot password?

Show Blog Categories
Hide Blog Categories
April 17, 2013

On Boston...

Written by Dena Evans

Boston_StrongFor many of us, running is our escape from the pressures of every day life.  A lot of avid runners find refuge in running for their clearest thinking and most meaningful conversations.   Running is often the longest stretch of peace we have all day.

 

Running the Boston Marathon is the closest many of us will get to the other side of the coin, the running experience had by the world beaters and the elite, appreciated by hundreds of thousands of cheering, screaming, and even kissing fans along the route from Hopkinton to Copley Square.   Our solitary or locally shared, mind clearing pursuit becomes the chance to enjoy the solidarity felt among those thousands who also wear their bright yellow or blue race shirt or jacket (and even their finisher’s medal) the following day in the airport or walking through the neighborhood in the days before.  Boston is the one race the folks in your neighborhood understand is a big deal.  They know that to go and compete, you must be very dedicated, fast, or both.

 

For the city of Boston and the towns of Hopkinton, Ashland, Framingham, Natick, Wellesley and its wall of screaming students, Newton, and Brookline along the way, the marathon is part of a larger and most American of traditions in the form of the Patriots’ Day holiday, a ritualistic morning first pitch at Fenway Park, and the pride of an entire region in hosting an event so steeped in the identity of the roads it travels that the mile markers and start line are permanently painted on the black top all year round, and Heartbreak Hill has become one of the most famous stretches of pavement on earth.  It is a day where every year, the world turns its attention to their city and appreciates the traditions they have grown up holding dear.

 

The Boston Marathon will always be known for all these things, but as of yesterday, it will of course now be known for something entirely different as well.

 

The events of April 15 will remain seared indelibly into the memories of those who ran that day, those who witnessed the unfolding tragedy, and those who traded pride and hopeful waiting for anxious delays of minutes and hours while waiting for family and friends who never were able to enjoy the triumphant crossing of the finish line on Boylston Street. However, no loss of innocence or disappointment in the broken promise of a day dawning with such hopefulness will compare to the losses of the victims or their families.  What has always been an afterglow of accomplishment and celebration was yesterday and will continue to be replaced by mourning, nagging fear, and bitterness at the havoc wreaked.

 

Yet, both Bostonians and the marathoners who make the ritual pilgrimage to these streets are made of tough and tested leather.  Undoubtedly, both will greet the days to come with stiff resolve, and an unwillingness to let those who would strike fear in the hearts of all of us gain the upper hand.   As those gathered for the race return home and to the regular routine, we can all be a part of the process of healing, being mindful of the peace that running can bring to ourselves and those close to us, and the community spirit of a city that has welcomed those hoping to test themselves in a pinnacle of their running lives for 117 years.   For thousands of runners and the nearly 200 victims, the finish line remains uncrossed.  Let us continue to cross further finish lines in the weeks, months, and years with confidence and mindfulness, with each one reinforcing the power of collective good to overcome those who would have it otherwise, and to return the finish line itself to a place of triumph rather than loss.

Runcoach is a brand owned by Focus-N-Fly, Inc Copyright 2020