Forgot username?     |     Forgot password?

January 24, 2013

Are You Injured or Are You Just Sore?

Written by Dena Evans

vulkan_instant_ice_packWhen one trains for a first-time finish goal, or breaks from a longstanding routine to reach for a time goal, the results can be highly beneficial.  Physical challenges to the body can arise from this new activity, but it can be hard to differentiate between sore body parts that are an acceptable part of the training and recovery cycle, and the start of an injury that should receive a more cautious approach and perhaps professional attention.    When in doubt, runcoach always recommends a visit to a medical professional.   Here are some suggestions for self-evaluation:

 

 

Is it the same in both legs?

After a marathon, or a hilly shorter race, both quads might be very sore.  If that soreness begins to ease in concert or acts the same in both limbs even while acute, there is a greater chance it is a function of a natural recovery cycle.  If instead one side remains abnormally painful, then a specific breakdown may have occurred which recovery alone won’t address.

 

Do you have to limp while running?

If you are literally unable to put full weight on one leg because your body is reflexively protecting it due to acute pain, it is time to stop ignoring it.

 

Does it persist over a week?

Delayed onset muscles soreness often means that our sore muscles get worse before they get better.  However, that process occurs over approximately a 48 hour period following the event.  If your “no big deal” sore body part is still similarly sore over a week after the stress, and your usual rolling, stretching, icing routines don’t appear to have eased the pain, a more involved problem might be at play. Even if that only means extended rest or adjustment to the schedule might be required, assessment for your own peace of mind might be a good idea.

 

Are you stuck in a repeatedly poor, or downward trending cycle of a chronic problem?

If a particular problem continues to reappear on a regular basis, and whereas it used to be fine with ice, now it needs Icy Hot, and requires a mile walk before running and two days off after….well, that no longer is an acceptably resolving issue!  Try to keep track of these types of issues in your log, so you can avoid letting chronic issues repeat to the point where you can’t run at all. Instead, investigate with a professional whether or not rest or other treatment in the short term can prevent more time off in the long term.

 

While these are a few guidelines worth considering, nothing replaces solid medical advice and great preventative care such as regular rolling, ancillary strength work, and adequate rest.  Be proactive and hopefully stay a step ahead of the need to answer the above questions very often!  Remember the body is a remarkably resilient vehicle.  When it is given proper recovery and treatment the results are terrific and a return to running imminent.

Runcoach is a brand owned by Focus-N-Fly, Inc Copyright 2021