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May 08, 2013

A Quick Guide to Common Running Lingo

Written by Dena Evans

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Quick Guide to Running Lingo

 

Like athletes in many other sports, runners have a vocabulary that may seem completely foreign to beginners.  Even experienced runners may be confused by some of the lingo.  At runcoach, we’re here to help!  Read on for a list of some common running terms.

 

For more info on specific terms used in your workout schedule, mouse over terms on your pace chart or contact us with your questions!

 

Negative Split/ Positive Split

Contrary to what these terms might imply, usually negative splits are more fun than positive splits.  A negative split is when the second half of your run, race, or interval is faster than the first half.  A positive split means you slowed down in the second half.  It only takes a few painful positive split efforts to remind you of the difference!

 

Kick

This is a general term for the final part of the race when an athlete is really going for it.  Another term used when talking about the kick might be “change gears.”  The runner increases frequency of their stride cadence and embarks upon a faster pace or harder effort level.  Don’t start kicking too early!  Make sure you have enough energy left to sustain this pace through the finish line.

 

Shake-out

This term can be used to describe a run that is light and easy and done just to get the kinks out.  We often describe the last run before a big race as a shakeout.  You might hear, “I went on my three mile shakeout this afternoon, before heading to the pasta dinner.”

 

LSD

Although running can indeed provide that “natural high,” when athletes refer to LSD, they are usually talking about Long Slow Distance, which is known on our runcoach schedules as aerobic runs or Easy / Long pace.

 

Fartlek

Eeeew!!! No, no, fartlek is a term for “speedplay” in Swedish.  It can mean a semi-unstructured run with varying periods of up-tempo running interspersed with easy recovery running.  These days, fartleks are often structured, but unmeasured sets of work at a perceived effort, such as 8x 2minutes comfortably hard with 90 seconds of easy running in between each.

 

Hitting the Wall

No need for a definition if you have felt it even once.  Hitting the wall can be described as a sudden and steep decrease in energy level and ability to perform at the previous pace due to the onset of fatigue, a lack of fueling, or both.  Mile 23 is a fairly common place to “hit the wall” in a marathon.  See “Bonked”.

Chip Time vs. Gun Time

In races where your time is recorded by wearing a computer chip that is read while traveling over mats along the pavement, you will often be given 2 different times in the race results.  The gun time is the time elapsed since the race was started,.  The chip time is time that begins when you actually cross the starting line mat.

 

PR or PB

These stand for Personal Record (usually US speaker) or Personal Best (usually everyone else).

 

Taper

The portion of your training cycle where you cease the really difficult workouts and attempt to get cumulative rest with lighter workouts while preparing for an upcoming race.

 

Bandit

A competitor running in the race without having officially entered.

 

Rabbit

An athlete charged with setting an early pace for the benefit of (usually) the top athletes in the race.  The rabbit usually then drops out at the agreed upon time, although there are examples of races where the pacer continued on and won!

 

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